The Roland-Morris disability scale for the assessment of non-specific low back pain outcomes among disability sector workers

Jin Ding Lin, Sheng Fang Su, Lan Ping Lin, Shang Wei Hsu, Jia Ling Wu, Cordia M. Chu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Low back pain (LBP) is the most common cause of time lost from work and has significant personal impacts and societal burdens. Caregivers for patients with disabilities have a high LBP prevalence that requires attention in the public health system. This study aimed to understand the LBP disability outcomes and determinants of care workers for people with intellectual, autistic and associated multiple disabilities. Study subjects included 678 care workers in 15 disability institutions who reported that they had experienced acute or chronic nonspecific LBP in the previous year. The effects of the LBP outcome were measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), which is a self-rated assessment of pain-related disability used in this study. The mean score of the RDQ was 3.97 (range 0-24). Of the respondents, 14% expressed that they were free from pain disability (score = 0), 66.4% subjects expressed they had a little pain disability (score 1-6), 14.7% subjects reported that they were mildly affected by pain disability (score 7-12), 3.8% subjects reported that they were moderately affected by pain disability (score 13-18), and 1% reported they had severe pain disability (score 19-24). A multiple linear regression of the pain disability score revealed that those care workers who expressed that LBP affects their work and living (p < 0.001), had ever sought pain care (p = 0.008), with moderate (p = 0.001) and severe (p = 0.001) levels of LBP were significantly associated with a higher score of pain disability than their counterparts (R 2 = 22.6%). This study suggests that a comprehensive assessment of pain disability and treatment strategies for LBP should be undertaken regarding the needs of care workers in disability sectors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1635-1640
Number of pages6
JournalResearch in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Low Back Pain
Pain
Pain Measurement
Caregivers
Linear Models
Public Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Caregiver
  • Disability Questionnaire
  • Disability sector
  • Low back pain
  • Roland-Morris

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Roland-Morris disability scale for the assessment of non-specific low back pain outcomes among disability sector workers. / Lin, Jin Ding; Su, Sheng Fang; Lin, Lan Ping; Hsu, Shang Wei; Wu, Jia Ling; Chu, Cordia M.

In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 8, No. 12, 01.01.2014, p. 1635-1640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Jin Ding ; Su, Sheng Fang ; Lin, Lan Ping ; Hsu, Shang Wei ; Wu, Jia Ling ; Chu, Cordia M. / The Roland-Morris disability scale for the assessment of non-specific low back pain outcomes among disability sector workers. In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 12. pp. 1635-1640.
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