The risk of irritable bowel syndrome in patients with endometriosis during a 5-year follow-up

a nationwide population-based cohort study

Chen Yi Wu, Wei Pin Chang, Yen Hou Chang, Chung Pin Li, Chi Mu Chuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Studies have suggested that endometriosis may coexist with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Using a population-based cohort study, we followed subjects for a 5-year period to identify the risk of IBS after a diagnosis of endometriosis. Methods: This cohort study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database as a source of subjects. A total of 6076 patients with endometriosis from 2000 to 2005 were identified. Their data were compared with those of 30,380 age-matched controls without endometriosis who were randomly selected from the same database. All subjects were tracked for 5 years from the date of cohort entry to identify the risk of IBS. The Cox model was used to evaluate the 5-year event occurrence of IBS. Results: Nine hundred twenty-six patients were diagnosed with IBS, including 256 in the case cohort (4.2 %) and 670 in the control cohort (2.2 %). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated significantly lower event-free rates in the case cohort than in the control cohort (P = 0.001). After adjusting for urbanization level, monthly income, residential region and comorbidities, the hazard ratio (HR) within 5 years revealed a 1.79-fold (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.55–2.07) greater risk among the cases than the controls. The HR was higher within the first year of follow-up (HR 1.90, 95 % CI 1.42–2.55) and in those women aged 25–34 years (HR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.61–2.92). Conclusions: The risk of IBS among endometriosis patients persisted over 5 years of follow-up. The association detected in this study might have proceeded through shared risk and pathogenic factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)907-912
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 28 2015

Fingerprint

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Endometriosis
Cohort Studies
Population
Confidence Intervals
Databases
Urbanization
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
National Health Programs
Taiwan
Proportional Hazards Models
Comorbidity

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Endometriosis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The risk of irritable bowel syndrome in patients with endometriosis during a 5-year follow-up : a nationwide population-based cohort study. / Wu, Chen Yi; Chang, Wei Pin; Chang, Yen Hou; Li, Chung Pin; Chuang, Chi Mu.

In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, Vol. 30, No. 7, 28.04.2015, p. 907-912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: Studies have suggested that endometriosis may coexist with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Using a population-based cohort study, we followed subjects for a 5-year period to identify the risk of IBS after a diagnosis of endometriosis. Methods: This cohort study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database as a source of subjects. A total of 6076 patients with endometriosis from 2000 to 2005 were identified. Their data were compared with those of 30,380 age-matched controls without endometriosis who were randomly selected from the same database. All subjects were tracked for 5 years from the date of cohort entry to identify the risk of IBS. The Cox model was used to evaluate the 5-year event occurrence of IBS. Results: Nine hundred twenty-six patients were diagnosed with IBS, including 256 in the case cohort (4.2 {\%}) and 670 in the control cohort (2.2 {\%}). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated significantly lower event-free rates in the case cohort than in the control cohort (P = 0.001). After adjusting for urbanization level, monthly income, residential region and comorbidities, the hazard ratio (HR) within 5 years revealed a 1.79-fold (95 {\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.55–2.07) greater risk among the cases than the controls. The HR was higher within the first year of follow-up (HR 1.90, 95 {\%} CI 1.42–2.55) and in those women aged 25–34 years (HR 2.17, 95 {\%} CI 1.61–2.92). Conclusions: The risk of IBS among endometriosis patients persisted over 5 years of follow-up. The association detected in this study might have proceeded through shared risk and pathogenic factors.",
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