The phenotypic response of bovine corneal endothelial cells on chitosan/polycaprolactone blends

Tsung Jen Wang, I. Jong Wang, Shi Chen, Yi Hsin Chen, Tai Horng Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although various behaviors of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) have been investigated, the interaction of CECs with different biodegradable biomaterials has not been systematically well explored. Thus, two common biodegradable biomaterials with dissimilar characteristics, chitosan and polycaprolactone (PCL), were examined in bovine CEC (BCEC) culture systems to elucidate their possible impact on clinical demand and scientific interest. The interaction between cells and matrices was also surveyed. Pure PCL could not be used for observation because of its opacity. Nevertheless, BCECs did not adhere and proliferate well on chitosan. To overcome this drawback, we developed blends using various proportions of chitosan and PCL: PCL 25, PCL 50, and PCL 75. As the content of PCL increased in the blends, BCECs showed greater degrees of adhesion and proliferation. Furthermore, cells reached confluence and maintained their typical hexagonal shape at day 7 on blends PCL 50 and PCL 75. In addition, when BCECs were cultured on the blends, the expressions of the differentiation marker N-cadherin and tight junction marker ZO-1 were well developed, resembling the physiological phenotypes. A possible explanation for the increased proliferation and preservation of BCECs on the blends is that blending chitosan and PCL could create a bioactive substratum. This method could regulate gene expression to synthesize more extracellular matrix type IV collagen, paving an important way to provide a favorable environment for BCEC cultures. Accordingly, promoting CEC growth effects by blending may be applied to the tissue engineering of corneal endothelium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-243
Number of pages8
JournalColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2012

Fingerprint

Polycaprolactone
Endothelial cells
Chitosan
Endothelial Cells
markers
endothelium
phenotype
tissue engineering
gene expression
Biocompatible Materials
collagens
matrices
activity (biology)
opacity
cells
Cell culture
Biomaterials
proportion
adhesion
polycaprolactone

Keywords

  • Blends
  • Chitosan
  • Corneal endothelial cells (CECs)
  • Polycaprolactone (PCL)
  • Type IV collagen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

The phenotypic response of bovine corneal endothelial cells on chitosan/polycaprolactone blends. / Wang, Tsung Jen; Wang, I. Jong; Chen, Shi; Chen, Yi Hsin; Young, Tai Horng.

In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, Vol. 90, No. 1, 01.02.2012, p. 236-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Tsung Jen ; Wang, I. Jong ; Chen, Shi ; Chen, Yi Hsin ; Young, Tai Horng. / The phenotypic response of bovine corneal endothelial cells on chitosan/polycaprolactone blends. In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces. 2012 ; Vol. 90, No. 1. pp. 236-243.
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