The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids

Meleah A. Hickman, Guisheng Zeng, Anja Forche, Matthew P. Hirakawa, Darren Abbey, Benjamin D. Harrison, Yan Ming Wang, Ching Hua Su, Richard J. Bennett, Yue Wang, Judith Berman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Candida albicans, the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, is considered to be an obligate diploid that carries recessive lethal mutations throughout the genome. Here we demonstrate that C. albicans has a viable haploid state that can be derived from diploid cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions, and that seems to arise through a concerted chromosome loss mechanism. Haploids undergo morphogenetic changes like those of diploids, including the yeast-hyphal transition, chlamydospore formation and a white-opaque switch that facilitates mating. Haploid opaque cells of opposite mating type mate efficiently to regenerate the diploid form, restoring heterozygosity and fitness. Homozygous diploids arise spontaneously by auto-diploidization, and both haploids and auto-diploids show a similar reduction in fitness, in vitro and in vivo, relative to heterozygous diploids, indicating that homozygous cell types are transient in mixed populations. Finally, we constructed stable haploid strains with multiple auxotrophies that will facilitate molecular and genetic analyses of this important pathogen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-59
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume494
Issue number7435
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 7 2013

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Haploidy
Diploidy
Candida albicans
Molecular Biology
Chromosomes
Yeasts
Genome
Mutation
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Hickman, M. A., Zeng, G., Forche, A., Hirakawa, M. P., Abbey, D., Harrison, B. D., ... Berman, J. (2013). The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids. Nature, 494(7435), 55-59. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature11865

The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids. / Hickman, Meleah A.; Zeng, Guisheng; Forche, Anja; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Abbey, Darren; Harrison, Benjamin D.; Wang, Yan Ming; Su, Ching Hua; Bennett, Richard J.; Wang, Yue; Berman, Judith.

In: Nature, Vol. 494, No. 7435, 07.02.2013, p. 55-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hickman, MA, Zeng, G, Forche, A, Hirakawa, MP, Abbey, D, Harrison, BD, Wang, YM, Su, CH, Bennett, RJ, Wang, Y & Berman, J 2013, 'The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids', Nature, vol. 494, no. 7435, pp. 55-59. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature11865
Hickman MA, Zeng G, Forche A, Hirakawa MP, Abbey D, Harrison BD et al. The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids. Nature. 2013 Feb 7;494(7435):55-59. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature11865
Hickman, Meleah A. ; Zeng, Guisheng ; Forche, Anja ; Hirakawa, Matthew P. ; Abbey, Darren ; Harrison, Benjamin D. ; Wang, Yan Ming ; Su, Ching Hua ; Bennett, Richard J. ; Wang, Yue ; Berman, Judith. / The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids. In: Nature. 2013 ; Vol. 494, No. 7435. pp. 55-59.
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