Abstract

Subjective perception of sleep is not necessarily consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) indications of sleep. The mismatch between subjective reports and objective measures is often referred to as “sleep state misperception.” Previous studies evince that this mismatch is found in both patients with insomnia and in normal sleepers, but the neurophysiological mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study is to explore the neurophysiological basis of this mechanism, from the perspective of both EEG power and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) fluctuations. Thirty-six healthy young adults participated in the study. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings were conducted while the participants were trying to fall asleep in an MRI scanner at approximately 9:00 pm. They were awakened after achieving stable N1 or N2 sleep, or after 90 min without falling into stable sleep. Next they were asked to recall their conscious experiences from the moment immediately prior to awakening. Sixty-one instances of scheduled awakenings were collected: 21 of these after having achieved stable stage N2 sleep; 12, during stage N1 sleep; and, 20 during the waking state. Relative to those awakenings without subjective-objective discrepancy (n = 27), these awakenings with discrepancy (n = 14) were associated with lower θ power, as well as higher α, β, and γ power. Moreover, we found that participants who exhibited the discrepancy, compared with those who did not, evinced a higher amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation levels in the prefrontal cortex. These results lend support to the conjecture that the subjective-objective discrepancy is associated with central nervous system hyperarousal.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberzsy056
JournalSleep
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Sleep
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Sleep Stages
Intrinsic Sleep Disorders
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Prefrontal Cortex
Young Adult
Central Nervous System
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • EEG spectral analysis
  • Functional brain imaging
  • Hyperarousal
  • Sleep state misperception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

The neurophysiological basis of the discrepancy between objective and subjective sleep during the sleep onset period : An EEG-fMRI study. / Hsiao, Fan Chi; Tsai, Pei Jung; Wu, Changwei W.; Yang, Chien Ming; Lane, Timothy Joseph; Lee, Hsin Chien; Chen, Ling Chun; Lee, We Kang; Lu, Lu Hsin; Wu, Yu Zu.

In: Sleep, Vol. 41, No. 6, zsy056, 01.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsiao, Fan Chi ; Tsai, Pei Jung ; Wu, Changwei W. ; Yang, Chien Ming ; Lane, Timothy Joseph ; Lee, Hsin Chien ; Chen, Ling Chun ; Lee, We Kang ; Lu, Lu Hsin ; Wu, Yu Zu. / The neurophysiological basis of the discrepancy between objective and subjective sleep during the sleep onset period : An EEG-fMRI study. In: Sleep. 2018 ; Vol. 41, No. 6.
@article{10e5f04723bd455180315ce64be52f3c,
title = "The neurophysiological basis of the discrepancy between objective and subjective sleep during the sleep onset period: An EEG-fMRI study",
abstract = "Subjective perception of sleep is not necessarily consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) indications of sleep. The mismatch between subjective reports and objective measures is often referred to as “sleep state misperception.” Previous studies evince that this mismatch is found in both patients with insomnia and in normal sleepers, but the neurophysiological mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study is to explore the neurophysiological basis of this mechanism, from the perspective of both EEG power and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) fluctuations. Thirty-six healthy young adults participated in the study. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings were conducted while the participants were trying to fall asleep in an MRI scanner at approximately 9:00 pm. They were awakened after achieving stable N1 or N2 sleep, or after 90 min without falling into stable sleep. Next they were asked to recall their conscious experiences from the moment immediately prior to awakening. Sixty-one instances of scheduled awakenings were collected: 21 of these after having achieved stable stage N2 sleep; 12, during stage N1 sleep; and, 20 during the waking state. Relative to those awakenings without subjective-objective discrepancy (n = 27), these awakenings with discrepancy (n = 14) were associated with lower θ power, as well as higher α, β, and γ power. Moreover, we found that participants who exhibited the discrepancy, compared with those who did not, evinced a higher amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation levels in the prefrontal cortex. These results lend support to the conjecture that the subjective-objective discrepancy is associated with central nervous system hyperarousal.",
keywords = "EEG spectral analysis, Functional brain imaging, Hyperarousal, Sleep state misperception",
author = "Hsiao, {Fan Chi} and Tsai, {Pei Jung} and Wu, {Changwei W.} and Yang, {Chien Ming} and Lane, {Timothy Joseph} and Lee, {Hsin Chien} and Chen, {Ling Chun} and Lee, {We Kang} and Lu, {Lu Hsin} and Wu, {Yu Zu}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/sleep/zsy056",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
journal = "Sleep",
issn = "0161-8105",
publisher = "American Academy of Sleep Medicine",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The neurophysiological basis of the discrepancy between objective and subjective sleep during the sleep onset period

T2 - An EEG-fMRI study

AU - Hsiao, Fan Chi

AU - Tsai, Pei Jung

AU - Wu, Changwei W.

AU - Yang, Chien Ming

AU - Lane, Timothy Joseph

AU - Lee, Hsin Chien

AU - Chen, Ling Chun

AU - Lee, We Kang

AU - Lu, Lu Hsin

AU - Wu, Yu Zu

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Subjective perception of sleep is not necessarily consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) indications of sleep. The mismatch between subjective reports and objective measures is often referred to as “sleep state misperception.” Previous studies evince that this mismatch is found in both patients with insomnia and in normal sleepers, but the neurophysiological mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study is to explore the neurophysiological basis of this mechanism, from the perspective of both EEG power and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) fluctuations. Thirty-six healthy young adults participated in the study. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings were conducted while the participants were trying to fall asleep in an MRI scanner at approximately 9:00 pm. They were awakened after achieving stable N1 or N2 sleep, or after 90 min without falling into stable sleep. Next they were asked to recall their conscious experiences from the moment immediately prior to awakening. Sixty-one instances of scheduled awakenings were collected: 21 of these after having achieved stable stage N2 sleep; 12, during stage N1 sleep; and, 20 during the waking state. Relative to those awakenings without subjective-objective discrepancy (n = 27), these awakenings with discrepancy (n = 14) were associated with lower θ power, as well as higher α, β, and γ power. Moreover, we found that participants who exhibited the discrepancy, compared with those who did not, evinced a higher amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation levels in the prefrontal cortex. These results lend support to the conjecture that the subjective-objective discrepancy is associated with central nervous system hyperarousal.

AB - Subjective perception of sleep is not necessarily consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) indications of sleep. The mismatch between subjective reports and objective measures is often referred to as “sleep state misperception.” Previous studies evince that this mismatch is found in both patients with insomnia and in normal sleepers, but the neurophysiological mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study is to explore the neurophysiological basis of this mechanism, from the perspective of both EEG power and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) fluctuations. Thirty-six healthy young adults participated in the study. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings were conducted while the participants were trying to fall asleep in an MRI scanner at approximately 9:00 pm. They were awakened after achieving stable N1 or N2 sleep, or after 90 min without falling into stable sleep. Next they were asked to recall their conscious experiences from the moment immediately prior to awakening. Sixty-one instances of scheduled awakenings were collected: 21 of these after having achieved stable stage N2 sleep; 12, during stage N1 sleep; and, 20 during the waking state. Relative to those awakenings without subjective-objective discrepancy (n = 27), these awakenings with discrepancy (n = 14) were associated with lower θ power, as well as higher α, β, and γ power. Moreover, we found that participants who exhibited the discrepancy, compared with those who did not, evinced a higher amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation levels in the prefrontal cortex. These results lend support to the conjecture that the subjective-objective discrepancy is associated with central nervous system hyperarousal.

KW - EEG spectral analysis

KW - Functional brain imaging

KW - Hyperarousal

KW - Sleep state misperception

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054937471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054937471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/sleep/zsy056

DO - 10.1093/sleep/zsy056

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85054937471

VL - 41

JO - Sleep

JF - Sleep

SN - 0161-8105

IS - 6

M1 - zsy056

ER -