Abstract

Our microbiota is determined by many variables including ABO blood groups. The microbiota is not only confined to the gut and skin but is also recoverable from blood of healthy donors. The microbiota shape our immune system through cross reactivity with antigens, the expression of direct molecular patterns, the release of cytokines, the effects on nutrients and micronutrients and even through an interplay with epigenetics. It is likely, therefore, that a donor's microbiota could alter the antigenicity of blood and its components and potentially contribute to transfusion-related immune modulation [TRIM]. It could also potentially transmit infections. The recipient's microbiome contributes, on the other hand, to the tolerance to transfused blood, or to the development of transfusion reactions. Cancer patients are a particularly vulnerable population, often immunosuppressed with a significantly altered microbiota. They are more at risk for transmission of “dormant” bacteria via blood transfusion. Furthermore, chemotherapy and radiation induce mucositis that likely results in significant translocation of gut microbiota and abnormal immune reactions to transfused blood. It is therefore relevant to revisit transfusion thresholds and consider transfusion-saving strategies in cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-335
Number of pages6
JournalTransfusion and Apheresis Science
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Neoplasms
Mucositis
Micronutrients
Vulnerable Populations
Blood Group Antigens
Blood Donors
Epigenomics
Blood Transfusion
Immune System
Tissue Donors
Radiation
Cytokines
Bacteria
Antigens
Drug Therapy
Food
Skin
Infection

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Microbiome
  • Transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

The microbiome and transfusion in cancer patients. / Goubran, Hadi; Seghatchian, Jerard; Radosevic, Julia; Ragab, Gaafar; Burnouf, Thierry.

In: Transfusion and Apheresis Science, Vol. 56, No. 3, 01.06.2017, p. 330-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Goubran, Hadi ; Seghatchian, Jerard ; Radosevic, Julia ; Ragab, Gaafar ; Burnouf, Thierry. / The microbiome and transfusion in cancer patients. In: Transfusion and Apheresis Science. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 330-335.
@article{67835eb0f2fd45cfb4c1f8fd5b2d9447,
title = "The microbiome and transfusion in cancer patients",
abstract = "Our microbiota is determined by many variables including ABO blood groups. The microbiota is not only confined to the gut and skin but is also recoverable from blood of healthy donors. The microbiota shape our immune system through cross reactivity with antigens, the expression of direct molecular patterns, the release of cytokines, the effects on nutrients and micronutrients and even through an interplay with epigenetics. It is likely, therefore, that a donor's microbiota could alter the antigenicity of blood and its components and potentially contribute to transfusion-related immune modulation [TRIM]. It could also potentially transmit infections. The recipient's microbiome contributes, on the other hand, to the tolerance to transfused blood, or to the development of transfusion reactions. Cancer patients are a particularly vulnerable population, often immunosuppressed with a significantly altered microbiota. They are more at risk for transmission of “dormant” bacteria via blood transfusion. Furthermore, chemotherapy and radiation induce mucositis that likely results in significant translocation of gut microbiota and abnormal immune reactions to transfused blood. It is therefore relevant to revisit transfusion thresholds and consider transfusion-saving strategies in cancer patients.",
keywords = "Cancer, Microbiome, Transfusion",
author = "Hadi Goubran and Jerard Seghatchian and Julia Radosevic and Gaafar Ragab and Thierry Burnouf",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.transci.2017.05.023",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "330--335",
journal = "Transfusion and Apheresis Science",
issn = "1473-0502",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The microbiome and transfusion in cancer patients

AU - Goubran, Hadi

AU - Seghatchian, Jerard

AU - Radosevic, Julia

AU - Ragab, Gaafar

AU - Burnouf, Thierry

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Our microbiota is determined by many variables including ABO blood groups. The microbiota is not only confined to the gut and skin but is also recoverable from blood of healthy donors. The microbiota shape our immune system through cross reactivity with antigens, the expression of direct molecular patterns, the release of cytokines, the effects on nutrients and micronutrients and even through an interplay with epigenetics. It is likely, therefore, that a donor's microbiota could alter the antigenicity of blood and its components and potentially contribute to transfusion-related immune modulation [TRIM]. It could also potentially transmit infections. The recipient's microbiome contributes, on the other hand, to the tolerance to transfused blood, or to the development of transfusion reactions. Cancer patients are a particularly vulnerable population, often immunosuppressed with a significantly altered microbiota. They are more at risk for transmission of “dormant” bacteria via blood transfusion. Furthermore, chemotherapy and radiation induce mucositis that likely results in significant translocation of gut microbiota and abnormal immune reactions to transfused blood. It is therefore relevant to revisit transfusion thresholds and consider transfusion-saving strategies in cancer patients.

AB - Our microbiota is determined by many variables including ABO blood groups. The microbiota is not only confined to the gut and skin but is also recoverable from blood of healthy donors. The microbiota shape our immune system through cross reactivity with antigens, the expression of direct molecular patterns, the release of cytokines, the effects on nutrients and micronutrients and even through an interplay with epigenetics. It is likely, therefore, that a donor's microbiota could alter the antigenicity of blood and its components and potentially contribute to transfusion-related immune modulation [TRIM]. It could also potentially transmit infections. The recipient's microbiome contributes, on the other hand, to the tolerance to transfused blood, or to the development of transfusion reactions. Cancer patients are a particularly vulnerable population, often immunosuppressed with a significantly altered microbiota. They are more at risk for transmission of “dormant” bacteria via blood transfusion. Furthermore, chemotherapy and radiation induce mucositis that likely results in significant translocation of gut microbiota and abnormal immune reactions to transfused blood. It is therefore relevant to revisit transfusion thresholds and consider transfusion-saving strategies in cancer patients.

KW - Cancer

KW - Microbiome

KW - Transfusion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020524802&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020524802&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.transci.2017.05.023

DO - 10.1016/j.transci.2017.05.023

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28633955

AN - SCOPUS:85020524802

VL - 56

SP - 330

EP - 335

JO - Transfusion and Apheresis Science

JF - Transfusion and Apheresis Science

SN - 1473-0502

IS - 3

ER -