The implementation of the consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori and barriers to consensus

Hsiu Chi Cheng, Jyh Ming Liou, Jiing Chyuan Luo, Cheng Tang Chiu, Ming Shiang Wu, Yi Chia Lee, Chun Ying Wu, Deng Chyang Wu, Ping I. Hsu, Chun Chao Chang, Wei Lun Chang, Jaw Town Lin, Bor Shyang Sheu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori has been developed. We aimed to assess whether dissemination through continuing medical education (CME) could enhance the adoption of this consensus among clinicians and to explore potential barriers to acceptance. Materials and methods: Four CME courses were held to disseminate the consensus. Adoption surveys were performed to evaluate participants’ behavior in the past and their commitment to adopt the consensus in future clinical practice after CME. The gaps and barriers to adoption were also surveyed. Results: A total of 240 physicians had attended the CME courses and received surveys with the 22 statements/substatements of the consensus. Before CME, adoption was good in six, fair in ten, and poor in six. After CME, 21 statements had either an initial >90% adoption or improvement to good or fair (P < 0.001), but one still had poor even though it showed improvement (P = 0.02). Although commitment was good or fair after CME, there was a >20% gap between “commitment” and “no barrier” to adoption for 11 statements, ten of which had a main barrier of financial incentives. Among the statements with fair or poor commitment after CME, less commitment to adoption and more barriers related to financial incentives were pronounced in clinicians serving in regional/district hospitals or clinics compared to those serving in medical centers. Conclusions: Continuing medical education may improve the adoption of the H. pylori consensus. The financial incentives were shown to be a main barrier to adoption of the consensus and should be improved.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12533
JournalHelicobacter
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2018

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Continuing Medical Education
Helicobacter pylori
Consensus
Motivation
District Hospitals
Pylorus
Physicians

Keywords

  • barrier
  • consensus
  • guideline
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • implementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Cheng, H. C., Liou, J. M., Luo, J. C., Chiu, C. T., Wu, M. S., Lee, Y. C., ... Sheu, B. S. (2018). The implementation of the consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori and barriers to consensus. Helicobacter, 23(5), [e12533]. https://doi.org/10.1111/hel.12533

The implementation of the consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori and barriers to consensus. / Cheng, Hsiu Chi; Liou, Jyh Ming; Luo, Jiing Chyuan; Chiu, Cheng Tang; Wu, Ming Shiang; Lee, Yi Chia; Wu, Chun Ying; Wu, Deng Chyang; Hsu, Ping I.; Chang, Chun Chao; Chang, Wei Lun; Lin, Jaw Town; Sheu, Bor Shyang.

In: Helicobacter, Vol. 23, No. 5, e12533, 01.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, HC, Liou, JM, Luo, JC, Chiu, CT, Wu, MS, Lee, YC, Wu, CY, Wu, DC, Hsu, PI, Chang, CC, Chang, WL, Lin, JT & Sheu, BS 2018, 'The implementation of the consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori and barriers to consensus', Helicobacter, vol. 23, no. 5, e12533. https://doi.org/10.1111/hel.12533
Cheng, Hsiu Chi ; Liou, Jyh Ming ; Luo, Jiing Chyuan ; Chiu, Cheng Tang ; Wu, Ming Shiang ; Lee, Yi Chia ; Wu, Chun Ying ; Wu, Deng Chyang ; Hsu, Ping I. ; Chang, Chun Chao ; Chang, Wei Lun ; Lin, Jaw Town ; Sheu, Bor Shyang. / The implementation of the consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori and barriers to consensus. In: Helicobacter. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 5.
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abstract = "Background: A consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori has been developed. We aimed to assess whether dissemination through continuing medical education (CME) could enhance the adoption of this consensus among clinicians and to explore potential barriers to acceptance. Materials and methods: Four CME courses were held to disseminate the consensus. Adoption surveys were performed to evaluate participants’ behavior in the past and their commitment to adopt the consensus in future clinical practice after CME. The gaps and barriers to adoption were also surveyed. Results: A total of 240 physicians had attended the CME courses and received surveys with the 22 statements/substatements of the consensus. Before CME, adoption was good in six, fair in ten, and poor in six. After CME, 21 statements had either an initial >90{\%} adoption or improvement to good or fair (P < 0.001), but one still had poor even though it showed improvement (P = 0.02). Although commitment was good or fair after CME, there was a >20{\%} gap between “commitment” and “no barrier” to adoption for 11 statements, ten of which had a main barrier of financial incentives. Among the statements with fair or poor commitment after CME, less commitment to adoption and more barriers related to financial incentives were pronounced in clinicians serving in regional/district hospitals or clinics compared to those serving in medical centers. Conclusions: Continuing medical education may improve the adoption of the H. pylori consensus. The financial incentives were shown to be a main barrier to adoption of the consensus and should be improved.",
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AU - Wu, Ming Shiang

AU - Lee, Yi Chia

AU - Wu, Chun Ying

AU - Wu, Deng Chyang

AU - Hsu, Ping I.

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AU - Chang, Wei Lun

AU - Lin, Jaw Town

AU - Sheu, Bor Shyang

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N2 - Background: A consensus on the management of Helicobacter pylori has been developed. We aimed to assess whether dissemination through continuing medical education (CME) could enhance the adoption of this consensus among clinicians and to explore potential barriers to acceptance. Materials and methods: Four CME courses were held to disseminate the consensus. Adoption surveys were performed to evaluate participants’ behavior in the past and their commitment to adopt the consensus in future clinical practice after CME. The gaps and barriers to adoption were also surveyed. Results: A total of 240 physicians had attended the CME courses and received surveys with the 22 statements/substatements of the consensus. Before CME, adoption was good in six, fair in ten, and poor in six. After CME, 21 statements had either an initial >90% adoption or improvement to good or fair (P < 0.001), but one still had poor even though it showed improvement (P = 0.02). Although commitment was good or fair after CME, there was a >20% gap between “commitment” and “no barrier” to adoption for 11 statements, ten of which had a main barrier of financial incentives. Among the statements with fair or poor commitment after CME, less commitment to adoption and more barriers related to financial incentives were pronounced in clinicians serving in regional/district hospitals or clinics compared to those serving in medical centers. Conclusions: Continuing medical education may improve the adoption of the H. pylori consensus. The financial incentives were shown to be a main barrier to adoption of the consensus and should be improved.

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