The impact of hepatitis B carrier on cardiac troponin I in 100-km ultramarathon runners

Li Hua Li, Chorng Kuang How, Wei Fong Kao, Yu Hui Chiu, Chen Meng, Cheng Chin Hsu, Yeou Guang Tsay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Prolonged endurance exercise is known to cause elevation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI). Previous studies have reported the correlation of several factors with exercise-induced cTnI release. However, the investigation of the predictors for elevated cTnI and postrace kinetics of cTnI after ultramarathon running is lacking, especially in an Oriental population. Methods Twenty-six participants, including eight hepatitis B virus carrier (HBVc) runners, who finished a 100-km ultramarathon in Taiwan were enrolled. For each participant, blood samples were collected 1 week before the race, as well as immediately and 24 hours after the finish. Results The results showed that 19 runners (73.1%) had postrace elevated cTnI levels and eight (30.8%) had elevated cTnI values lasting more than 24 hours after the run. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the HBV status was a factor related to the high level of cTnI after 24 hours of running (β = 0.03, p = 0.08). The recovery of plasma cTnI levels was delayed in ultramarathon runners with latent HBV infection. Among HBVc runners, multiple linear regression analyses showed age (β = −0.01), previous running experience (β = −0.06), training distance (β = 0.37), and 4 hours of running distance (β = −0.04) as significant predictors of higher postrace cTnI levels. Conclusion For most athletes, cTnI values significantly increased immediately following the race in the absence of adverse clinical sequelae, and HBVc runners had higher and prolonged cTnI levels. While several factors are identified for such HBV effects, the specific causes need further elucidation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-352
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Chinese Medical Association
Volume80
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2017

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Troponin I
Hepatitis B
Running
Hepatitis B virus
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Exercise
Taiwan
Athletes

Keywords

  • hepatitis B carrier
  • troponin I
  • ultramarathon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The impact of hepatitis B carrier on cardiac troponin I in 100-km ultramarathon runners. / Li, Li Hua; How, Chorng Kuang; Kao, Wei Fong; Chiu, Yu Hui; Meng, Chen; Hsu, Cheng Chin; Tsay, Yeou Guang.

In: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, Vol. 80, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 347-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Li Hua ; How, Chorng Kuang ; Kao, Wei Fong ; Chiu, Yu Hui ; Meng, Chen ; Hsu, Cheng Chin ; Tsay, Yeou Guang. / The impact of hepatitis B carrier on cardiac troponin I in 100-km ultramarathon runners. In: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association. 2017 ; Vol. 80, No. 6. pp. 347-352.
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abstract = "Background Prolonged endurance exercise is known to cause elevation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI). Previous studies have reported the correlation of several factors with exercise-induced cTnI release. However, the investigation of the predictors for elevated cTnI and postrace kinetics of cTnI after ultramarathon running is lacking, especially in an Oriental population. Methods Twenty-six participants, including eight hepatitis B virus carrier (HBVc) runners, who finished a 100-km ultramarathon in Taiwan were enrolled. For each participant, blood samples were collected 1 week before the race, as well as immediately and 24 hours after the finish. Results The results showed that 19 runners (73.1{\%}) had postrace elevated cTnI levels and eight (30.8{\%}) had elevated cTnI values lasting more than 24 hours after the run. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the HBV status was a factor related to the high level of cTnI after 24 hours of running (β = 0.03, p = 0.08). The recovery of plasma cTnI levels was delayed in ultramarathon runners with latent HBV infection. Among HBVc runners, multiple linear regression analyses showed age (β = −0.01), previous running experience (β = −0.06), training distance (β = 0.37), and 4 hours of running distance (β = −0.04) as significant predictors of higher postrace cTnI levels. Conclusion For most athletes, cTnI values significantly increased immediately following the race in the absence of adverse clinical sequelae, and HBVc runners had higher and prolonged cTnI levels. While several factors are identified for such HBV effects, the specific causes need further elucidation.",
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AB - Background Prolonged endurance exercise is known to cause elevation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI). Previous studies have reported the correlation of several factors with exercise-induced cTnI release. However, the investigation of the predictors for elevated cTnI and postrace kinetics of cTnI after ultramarathon running is lacking, especially in an Oriental population. Methods Twenty-six participants, including eight hepatitis B virus carrier (HBVc) runners, who finished a 100-km ultramarathon in Taiwan were enrolled. For each participant, blood samples were collected 1 week before the race, as well as immediately and 24 hours after the finish. Results The results showed that 19 runners (73.1%) had postrace elevated cTnI levels and eight (30.8%) had elevated cTnI values lasting more than 24 hours after the run. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the HBV status was a factor related to the high level of cTnI after 24 hours of running (β = 0.03, p = 0.08). The recovery of plasma cTnI levels was delayed in ultramarathon runners with latent HBV infection. Among HBVc runners, multiple linear regression analyses showed age (β = −0.01), previous running experience (β = −0.06), training distance (β = 0.37), and 4 hours of running distance (β = −0.04) as significant predictors of higher postrace cTnI levels. Conclusion For most athletes, cTnI values significantly increased immediately following the race in the absence of adverse clinical sequelae, and HBVc runners had higher and prolonged cTnI levels. While several factors are identified for such HBV effects, the specific causes need further elucidation.

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