The effectiveness of an accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational educational programme in reducing anxiety and increasing satisfaction of patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation

Ka Lai Wu, Su-Ru Chen, Wen Chin Ko, Shu-Yu Kuo, Ping-Ling Chen, Hui Fang Su, Wen-Yin Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational educational programme in reducing anxiety and increasing satisfaction with the information and materials received by patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation. Background: Cardiac catheterisation is one of the most anxiety-provoking invasive procedures for patients. However, informational education using multimedia to inform patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation has not been extensively explored. Design: A randomised experimental design with three-cohort prospective comparisons. Methods: In total, 123 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: regular education; (group 1), accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education (group 2) and instructional digital videodisc education (group 3). Anxiety was measured with Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory, which was administered at four time intervals: before education (T0), immediately after education (T1), before cardiac catheterisation (T2) and one day after cardiac catheterisation (T3). A satisfaction questionnaire was administrated one day after cardiac catheterisation. Data were collected from May 2009-September 2010 and analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, one-way analysis of variance, Scheffe's post hoc test and generalised estimating equations. Results: All patients experienced moderate anxiety at T0 to low anxiety at T3. Accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education patients had significantly lower anxiety levels and felt the most satisfied with the information and materials received compared with patients in groups 1 and 3. A statistically significant difference in anxiety levels was only found at T2 among the three groups (p = 0·004). Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that the accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education was the most effective informational educational module for informing patients about their upcoming cardiac catheterisation, to reduce anxiety and improve satisfaction with the information and materials received compared with the regular education and instructional digital videodisc education. Relevance to clinical practice: As the accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education reduced patient anxiety and improved satisfaction with the information and materials received, it can be adapted to complement patient education in future regular cardiac care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2063-2073
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume23
Issue number13-14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Multimedia
Cardiac Catheterization
Patient Satisfaction
Anxiety
Education
Patient Education
Analysis of Variance
Research Design
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Informational education
  • Instructional digital videodisc
  • Multimedia
  • Satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Aims and objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational educational programme in reducing anxiety and increasing satisfaction with the information and materials received by patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation. Background: Cardiac catheterisation is one of the most anxiety-provoking invasive procedures for patients. However, informational education using multimedia to inform patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation has not been extensively explored. Design: A randomised experimental design with three-cohort prospective comparisons. Methods: In total, 123 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: regular education; (group 1), accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education (group 2) and instructional digital videodisc education (group 3). Anxiety was measured with Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory, which was administered at four time intervals: before education (T0), immediately after education (T1), before cardiac catheterisation (T2) and one day after cardiac catheterisation (T3). A satisfaction questionnaire was administrated one day after cardiac catheterisation. Data were collected from May 2009-September 2010 and analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, one-way analysis of variance, Scheffe's post hoc test and generalised estimating equations. Results: All patients experienced moderate anxiety at T0 to low anxiety at T3. Accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education patients had significantly lower anxiety levels and felt the most satisfied with the information and materials received compared with patients in groups 1 and 3. A statistically significant difference in anxiety levels was only found at T2 among the three groups (p = 0·004). Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that the accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education was the most effective informational educational module for informing patients about their upcoming cardiac catheterisation, to reduce anxiety and improve satisfaction with the information and materials received compared with the regular education and instructional digital videodisc education. Relevance to clinical practice: As the accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education reduced patient anxiety and improved satisfaction with the information and materials received, it can be adapted to complement patient education in future regular cardiac care.",
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AU - Wu, Ka Lai

AU - Chen, Su-Ru

AU - Ko, Wen Chin

AU - Kuo, Shu-Yu

AU - Chen, Ping-Ling

AU - Su, Hui Fang

AU - Chang, Wen-Yin

PY - 2014

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AB - Aims and objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational educational programme in reducing anxiety and increasing satisfaction with the information and materials received by patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation. Background: Cardiac catheterisation is one of the most anxiety-provoking invasive procedures for patients. However, informational education using multimedia to inform patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation has not been extensively explored. Design: A randomised experimental design with three-cohort prospective comparisons. Methods: In total, 123 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: regular education; (group 1), accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education (group 2) and instructional digital videodisc education (group 3). Anxiety was measured with Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory, which was administered at four time intervals: before education (T0), immediately after education (T1), before cardiac catheterisation (T2) and one day after cardiac catheterisation (T3). A satisfaction questionnaire was administrated one day after cardiac catheterisation. Data were collected from May 2009-September 2010 and analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, one-way analysis of variance, Scheffe's post hoc test and generalised estimating equations. Results: All patients experienced moderate anxiety at T0 to low anxiety at T3. Accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education patients had significantly lower anxiety levels and felt the most satisfied with the information and materials received compared with patients in groups 1 and 3. A statistically significant difference in anxiety levels was only found at T2 among the three groups (p = 0·004). Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that the accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education was the most effective informational educational module for informing patients about their upcoming cardiac catheterisation, to reduce anxiety and improve satisfaction with the information and materials received compared with the regular education and instructional digital videodisc education. Relevance to clinical practice: As the accessibility-enhanced multimedia informational education reduced patient anxiety and improved satisfaction with the information and materials received, it can be adapted to complement patient education in future regular cardiac care.

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KW - Multimedia

KW - Satisfaction

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