The Effectiveness of a Simulation-Based Flipped Classroom in the Acquisition of Laparoscopic Suturing Skills in Medical Students-A Pilot Study

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a simulation-based flipped classroom in gaining the laparoscopic skills in medical students. Design: An intervention trial. Setting: Taipei Medical University Hospital, an academic teaching hospital. Participants and Methods: Fifty-nine medical students participating in a 1-hour laparoscopic skill training session were randomly assigned to a conventional classroom (n = 29) or a flipped classroom approach (n = 30) based on their registered order. At the end of the session, instructors assessed participants' performance in laparoscopic suturing and intracorporeal knot-tying using the assessment checklist based on a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills tool. Results: Students in the flipped group completed more numbers of stitches (mean [. M] = 0.47; standard deviation [SD] = 0.507) than those in the conventional group (M = 0.10; SD = 0.310) (mean difference: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.114-582; p = 0.002). Moreover, students in the flipped group also had higher stitch quality scores (M = 7.17; SD = 2.730) than those in the conventional group (M = 5.14; SD = 1.767) (mean difference = 2.03; 95% CI: 0.83-3.228; p = 0.001). Meanwhile, students in the flipped group had higher pass rates for the second throw (p < 0.001), third throw (p = 0.002), appropriate tissue reapproximation without loosening or strangulation (p < 0.001), needle cut from suture under direct visualization (p = 0.004), and needle safely removed under direct visualization (p = 0.018) than those in the conventional group. Conclusions: Comparing with traditional approach, a simulation-based flipped classroom approach may improve laparoscopic intracorporeal knot-tying skill acquisition in medical students.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Medical Students
medical student
Students
classroom
simulation
Needles
Group
Checklist
Teaching Hospitals
Sutures
visualization
student
instructor
Teaching
performance

Keywords

  • Clinical skills
  • Flipped classroom
  • Laparoscopic suture
  • Medical education
  • Medical Knowledge
  • Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

@article{dd8ed230d7014636a1ac096fd8fdd45a,
title = "The Effectiveness of a Simulation-Based Flipped Classroom in the Acquisition of Laparoscopic Suturing Skills in Medical Students-A Pilot Study",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a simulation-based flipped classroom in gaining the laparoscopic skills in medical students. Design: An intervention trial. Setting: Taipei Medical University Hospital, an academic teaching hospital. Participants and Methods: Fifty-nine medical students participating in a 1-hour laparoscopic skill training session were randomly assigned to a conventional classroom (n = 29) or a flipped classroom approach (n = 30) based on their registered order. At the end of the session, instructors assessed participants' performance in laparoscopic suturing and intracorporeal knot-tying using the assessment checklist based on a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills tool. Results: Students in the flipped group completed more numbers of stitches (mean [. M] = 0.47; standard deviation [SD] = 0.507) than those in the conventional group (M = 0.10; SD = 0.310) (mean difference: 0.37; 95{\%} CI: 0.114-582; p = 0.002). Moreover, students in the flipped group also had higher stitch quality scores (M = 7.17; SD = 2.730) than those in the conventional group (M = 5.14; SD = 1.767) (mean difference = 2.03; 95{\%} CI: 0.83-3.228; p = 0.001). Meanwhile, students in the flipped group had higher pass rates for the second throw (p < 0.001), third throw (p = 0.002), appropriate tissue reapproximation without loosening or strangulation (p < 0.001), needle cut from suture under direct visualization (p = 0.004), and needle safely removed under direct visualization (p = 0.018) than those in the conventional group. Conclusions: Comparing with traditional approach, a simulation-based flipped classroom approach may improve laparoscopic intracorporeal knot-tying skill acquisition in medical students.",
keywords = "Clinical skills, Flipped classroom, Laparoscopic suture, Medical education, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Simulation",
author = "Chiu, {Hsin Yi} and Kang, {Yi No} and Wang, {Wei Lin} and Huang, {Hung Chang} and Wu, {Chien Chih} and Wayne Hsu and Tong, {Yiu Shun} and Wei, {Po Li}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsurg.2017.07.007",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Education",
issn = "1931-7204",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effectiveness of a Simulation-Based Flipped Classroom in the Acquisition of Laparoscopic Suturing Skills in Medical Students-A Pilot Study

AU - Chiu, Hsin Yi

AU - Kang, Yi No

AU - Wang, Wei Lin

AU - Huang, Hung Chang

AU - Wu, Chien Chih

AU - Hsu, Wayne

AU - Tong, Yiu Shun

AU - Wei, Po Li

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a simulation-based flipped classroom in gaining the laparoscopic skills in medical students. Design: An intervention trial. Setting: Taipei Medical University Hospital, an academic teaching hospital. Participants and Methods: Fifty-nine medical students participating in a 1-hour laparoscopic skill training session were randomly assigned to a conventional classroom (n = 29) or a flipped classroom approach (n = 30) based on their registered order. At the end of the session, instructors assessed participants' performance in laparoscopic suturing and intracorporeal knot-tying using the assessment checklist based on a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills tool. Results: Students in the flipped group completed more numbers of stitches (mean [. M] = 0.47; standard deviation [SD] = 0.507) than those in the conventional group (M = 0.10; SD = 0.310) (mean difference: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.114-582; p = 0.002). Moreover, students in the flipped group also had higher stitch quality scores (M = 7.17; SD = 2.730) than those in the conventional group (M = 5.14; SD = 1.767) (mean difference = 2.03; 95% CI: 0.83-3.228; p = 0.001). Meanwhile, students in the flipped group had higher pass rates for the second throw (p < 0.001), third throw (p = 0.002), appropriate tissue reapproximation without loosening or strangulation (p < 0.001), needle cut from suture under direct visualization (p = 0.004), and needle safely removed under direct visualization (p = 0.018) than those in the conventional group. Conclusions: Comparing with traditional approach, a simulation-based flipped classroom approach may improve laparoscopic intracorporeal knot-tying skill acquisition in medical students.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a simulation-based flipped classroom in gaining the laparoscopic skills in medical students. Design: An intervention trial. Setting: Taipei Medical University Hospital, an academic teaching hospital. Participants and Methods: Fifty-nine medical students participating in a 1-hour laparoscopic skill training session were randomly assigned to a conventional classroom (n = 29) or a flipped classroom approach (n = 30) based on their registered order. At the end of the session, instructors assessed participants' performance in laparoscopic suturing and intracorporeal knot-tying using the assessment checklist based on a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills tool. Results: Students in the flipped group completed more numbers of stitches (mean [. M] = 0.47; standard deviation [SD] = 0.507) than those in the conventional group (M = 0.10; SD = 0.310) (mean difference: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.114-582; p = 0.002). Moreover, students in the flipped group also had higher stitch quality scores (M = 7.17; SD = 2.730) than those in the conventional group (M = 5.14; SD = 1.767) (mean difference = 2.03; 95% CI: 0.83-3.228; p = 0.001). Meanwhile, students in the flipped group had higher pass rates for the second throw (p < 0.001), third throw (p = 0.002), appropriate tissue reapproximation without loosening or strangulation (p < 0.001), needle cut from suture under direct visualization (p = 0.004), and needle safely removed under direct visualization (p = 0.018) than those in the conventional group. Conclusions: Comparing with traditional approach, a simulation-based flipped classroom approach may improve laparoscopic intracorporeal knot-tying skill acquisition in medical students.

KW - Clinical skills

KW - Flipped classroom

KW - Laparoscopic suture

KW - Medical education

KW - Medical Knowledge

KW - Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

KW - Simulation

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DO - 10.1016/j.jsurg.2017.07.007

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JO - Journal of Surgical Education

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