The effect of oil components on the physicochemical properties and drug delivery of emulsions: Tocol emulsion versus lipid emulsion

Chi Feng Hung, Chia Lang Fang, Mei Hui Liao, Jia You Fang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An emulsion system composed of vitamin E, coconut oil, soybean phosphatidylcholine, non-ionic surfactants, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives (referred to as the tocol emulsion) was characterized in terms of its physicochemical properties, drug release, in vivo efficacy, toxicity, and stability. Systems without vitamin E (referred to as the lipid emulsion) and without any oils (referred to as the aqueous micelle system) were prepared for comparison. A lipophilic antioxidant, resveratrol, was used as the model drug for emulsion loading. The incorporation of Brij 35 and PEG derivatives reduced the vesicle diameter to tocol emulsion > lipid emulsion. Treatment of resveratrol dramatically reduced the intimal hyperplasia of the injured vascular wall in rats. There was no significant difference in this reduction when resveratrol was delivered by either emulsion or the aqueous micelle system. The percentages of erythrocyte hemolysis by the emulsions and aqueous micelle system were ∼0 and ∼10%, respectively. Vitamin E prevented the aggregation of emulsion vesicles. The mean vesicle size of the tocol emulsion remained unchanged during 30 days at 37 °C. The lipid emulsion and aqueous micelle system, respectively, showed 11- and 16-fold increases in vesicle size after 30 days of storage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-202
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics
Volume335
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 20 2007

Fingerprint

Emulsions
Oils
Lipids
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Micelles
Vitamin E
tocol
Tunica Intima
Hemolysis
Phosphatidylcholines
Soybeans
Surface-Active Agents
Hyperplasia
Blood Vessels
Antioxidants
Erythrocytes

Keywords

  • Aqueous micelle
  • Drug delivery
  • Lipid emulsion
  • Resveratrol
  • Tocol emulsion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

The effect of oil components on the physicochemical properties and drug delivery of emulsions : Tocol emulsion versus lipid emulsion. / Hung, Chi Feng; Fang, Chia Lang; Liao, Mei Hui; Fang, Jia You.

In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Vol. 335, No. 1-2, 20.04.2007, p. 193-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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