The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

Y. C. Lee, A. M F Yen, J. J. Tai, S. H. Chang, J. T. Lin, H. M. Chiu, H. P. Wang, M. S. Wu, T. H H Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background and aims: The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), which remains elusive, was quantified. Methods: The population included 3669 subjects undergoing repeated upper endoscopy. Data were analysed using a three-state Markov model to estimate transition rates (according to the Los Angeles classification) regarding the natural course of the disease. Individual risk score together with the kinetic curve was derived by identifying significant factors responsible for the net force between progression and regression. Results: During three consecutive study periods, 12.2, 14.9 and 17.9% of subjects, respectively, progressed from non-erosive to erosive disease, whereas 42.5, 37.3 and 34.6%, respectively, regressed to the non-erosive stage. The annual transition rate from non-erosive to class A-B disease was 0.151 per person year (95% CI 0.136 to 0.165) and from class A-B to C-D was 0.079 per person year (95% CI 0.063 to 0.094). The regression rate from class A-B to non-erosive disease was 0.481 per person year (95% CI 0.425 to 0.536). Class C-D, however, appeared to be an absorbing state when not properly treated. Being male (relative risk (RR) 4.31; 95% CI 3.22 to 5.75), smoking (RR 1.20; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.39) or having metabolic syndrome (RR 1.75; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.38) independently increased the likelihood of progressing from a non-erosive to an erosive stage of disease and/or lowered the likelihood of disease regression. The short-term use of acid suppressants (RR 0.54; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.75) raised the likelihood of regression from erosive to non-erosive disease. Conclusions: Intraoesophageal damage is a dynamic and migratory process in which the metabolic syndrome is associated with accelerated progression to or attenuated regression from erosive states. These findings have important implications for the design of effective prevention and screening strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-181
Number of pages8
JournalGut
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Esophageal Diseases
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Los Angeles
Endoscopy
Smoking
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Lee, Y. C., Yen, A. M. F., Tai, J. J., Chang, S. H., Lin, J. T., Chiu, H. M., ... Chen, T. H. H. (2009). The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Gut, 58(2), 174-181. https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.2008.162305

The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. / Lee, Y. C.; Yen, A. M F; Tai, J. J.; Chang, S. H.; Lin, J. T.; Chiu, H. M.; Wang, H. P.; Wu, M. S.; Chen, T. H H.

In: Gut, Vol. 58, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 174-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, YC, Yen, AMF, Tai, JJ, Chang, SH, Lin, JT, Chiu, HM, Wang, HP, Wu, MS & Chen, THH 2009, 'The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease', Gut, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 174-181. https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.2008.162305
Lee, Y. C. ; Yen, A. M F ; Tai, J. J. ; Chang, S. H. ; Lin, J. T. ; Chiu, H. M. ; Wang, H. P. ; Wu, M. S. ; Chen, T. H H. / The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In: Gut. 2009 ; Vol. 58, No. 2. pp. 174-181.
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abstract = "Background and aims: The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), which remains elusive, was quantified. Methods: The population included 3669 subjects undergoing repeated upper endoscopy. Data were analysed using a three-state Markov model to estimate transition rates (according to the Los Angeles classification) regarding the natural course of the disease. Individual risk score together with the kinetic curve was derived by identifying significant factors responsible for the net force between progression and regression. Results: During three consecutive study periods, 12.2, 14.9 and 17.9{\%} of subjects, respectively, progressed from non-erosive to erosive disease, whereas 42.5, 37.3 and 34.6{\%}, respectively, regressed to the non-erosive stage. The annual transition rate from non-erosive to class A-B disease was 0.151 per person year (95{\%} CI 0.136 to 0.165) and from class A-B to C-D was 0.079 per person year (95{\%} CI 0.063 to 0.094). The regression rate from class A-B to non-erosive disease was 0.481 per person year (95{\%} CI 0.425 to 0.536). Class C-D, however, appeared to be an absorbing state when not properly treated. Being male (relative risk (RR) 4.31; 95{\%} CI 3.22 to 5.75), smoking (RR 1.20; 95{\%} CI 1.03 to 1.39) or having metabolic syndrome (RR 1.75; 95{\%} CI 1.29 to 2.38) independently increased the likelihood of progressing from a non-erosive to an erosive stage of disease and/or lowered the likelihood of disease regression. The short-term use of acid suppressants (RR 0.54; 95{\%} CI 0.39 to 0.75) raised the likelihood of regression from erosive to non-erosive disease. Conclusions: Intraoesophageal damage is a dynamic and migratory process in which the metabolic syndrome is associated with accelerated progression to or attenuated regression from erosive states. These findings have important implications for the design of effective prevention and screening strategies.",
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AU - Yen, A. M F

AU - Tai, J. J.

AU - Chang, S. H.

AU - Lin, J. T.

AU - Chiu, H. M.

AU - Wang, H. P.

AU - Wu, M. S.

AU - Chen, T. H H

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N2 - Background and aims: The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), which remains elusive, was quantified. Methods: The population included 3669 subjects undergoing repeated upper endoscopy. Data were analysed using a three-state Markov model to estimate transition rates (according to the Los Angeles classification) regarding the natural course of the disease. Individual risk score together with the kinetic curve was derived by identifying significant factors responsible for the net force between progression and regression. Results: During three consecutive study periods, 12.2, 14.9 and 17.9% of subjects, respectively, progressed from non-erosive to erosive disease, whereas 42.5, 37.3 and 34.6%, respectively, regressed to the non-erosive stage. The annual transition rate from non-erosive to class A-B disease was 0.151 per person year (95% CI 0.136 to 0.165) and from class A-B to C-D was 0.079 per person year (95% CI 0.063 to 0.094). The regression rate from class A-B to non-erosive disease was 0.481 per person year (95% CI 0.425 to 0.536). Class C-D, however, appeared to be an absorbing state when not properly treated. Being male (relative risk (RR) 4.31; 95% CI 3.22 to 5.75), smoking (RR 1.20; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.39) or having metabolic syndrome (RR 1.75; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.38) independently increased the likelihood of progressing from a non-erosive to an erosive stage of disease and/or lowered the likelihood of disease regression. The short-term use of acid suppressants (RR 0.54; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.75) raised the likelihood of regression from erosive to non-erosive disease. Conclusions: Intraoesophageal damage is a dynamic and migratory process in which the metabolic syndrome is associated with accelerated progression to or attenuated regression from erosive states. These findings have important implications for the design of effective prevention and screening strategies.

AB - Background and aims: The effect of metabolic risk factors on the natural course of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), which remains elusive, was quantified. Methods: The population included 3669 subjects undergoing repeated upper endoscopy. Data were analysed using a three-state Markov model to estimate transition rates (according to the Los Angeles classification) regarding the natural course of the disease. Individual risk score together with the kinetic curve was derived by identifying significant factors responsible for the net force between progression and regression. Results: During three consecutive study periods, 12.2, 14.9 and 17.9% of subjects, respectively, progressed from non-erosive to erosive disease, whereas 42.5, 37.3 and 34.6%, respectively, regressed to the non-erosive stage. The annual transition rate from non-erosive to class A-B disease was 0.151 per person year (95% CI 0.136 to 0.165) and from class A-B to C-D was 0.079 per person year (95% CI 0.063 to 0.094). The regression rate from class A-B to non-erosive disease was 0.481 per person year (95% CI 0.425 to 0.536). Class C-D, however, appeared to be an absorbing state when not properly treated. Being male (relative risk (RR) 4.31; 95% CI 3.22 to 5.75), smoking (RR 1.20; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.39) or having metabolic syndrome (RR 1.75; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.38) independently increased the likelihood of progressing from a non-erosive to an erosive stage of disease and/or lowered the likelihood of disease regression. The short-term use of acid suppressants (RR 0.54; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.75) raised the likelihood of regression from erosive to non-erosive disease. Conclusions: Intraoesophageal damage is a dynamic and migratory process in which the metabolic syndrome is associated with accelerated progression to or attenuated regression from erosive states. These findings have important implications for the design of effective prevention and screening strategies.

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