The Effect of Low-Dose Dopamine Infusion on Cardiopulmonary and Renal Status in Premature Newborns With Respiratory Distress-syndrome

Lily Cuevas, Tsu F. Yeh, Eunice G. John, Danilo Cuevas, Rosita S. Plides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• To study the effects of infusion of low doses of dopamine hydrochloride on cardiopulmonary and renal status in premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, 49 newborns were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (18 patients) received no dopamine and was the control group; group 2 (16 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 1.0 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours; and group 3 (15 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 2.5 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours. Birth weights, gestational ages, postnatal ages, and cardiopulmonary status of all groups at the start of the study were comparable. Continuous infusion of these low doses of dopamine for 3 days after birth did not significantly improve levels of blood gases, acid-base balance, or clinical outcome. In newborns with systemic hypotension, dopamine improved cardiovascular status and caused early return of blood pressure to the normal range. Infusion of low doses of dopamine produced mild to moderate natriuresis and insignificant increases in glomerular filtration rate and urine volume. (AJDC. 1991;145:799-803)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)787-796
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume145
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Dopamine
Kidney
Body Weight
Newborn Infant
Natriuresis
Acid-Base Equilibrium
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Birth Weight
Hypotension
Gestational Age
Reference Values
Gases
Urine
Parturition
Blood Pressure
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The Effect of Low-Dose Dopamine Infusion on Cardiopulmonary and Renal Status in Premature Newborns With Respiratory Distress-syndrome. / Cuevas, Lily; Yeh, Tsu F.; John, Eunice G.; Cuevas, Danilo; Plides, Rosita S.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 145, No. 7, 01.01.1991, p. 787-796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ebbd8741a01a4a4498411ad6992a1744,
title = "The Effect of Low-Dose Dopamine Infusion on Cardiopulmonary and Renal Status in Premature Newborns With Respiratory Distress-syndrome",
abstract = "• To study the effects of infusion of low doses of dopamine hydrochloride on cardiopulmonary and renal status in premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, 49 newborns were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (18 patients) received no dopamine and was the control group; group 2 (16 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 1.0 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours; and group 3 (15 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 2.5 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours. Birth weights, gestational ages, postnatal ages, and cardiopulmonary status of all groups at the start of the study were comparable. Continuous infusion of these low doses of dopamine for 3 days after birth did not significantly improve levels of blood gases, acid-base balance, or clinical outcome. In newborns with systemic hypotension, dopamine improved cardiovascular status and caused early return of blood pressure to the normal range. Infusion of low doses of dopamine produced mild to moderate natriuresis and insignificant increases in glomerular filtration rate and urine volume. (AJDC. 1991;145:799-803)",
author = "Lily Cuevas and Yeh, {Tsu F.} and John, {Eunice G.} and Danilo Cuevas and Plides, {Rosita S.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160070095028",
language = "English",
volume = "145",
pages = "787--796",
journal = "JAMA Pediatrics",
issn = "2168-6203",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Low-Dose Dopamine Infusion on Cardiopulmonary and Renal Status in Premature Newborns With Respiratory Distress-syndrome

AU - Cuevas, Lily

AU - Yeh, Tsu F.

AU - John, Eunice G.

AU - Cuevas, Danilo

AU - Plides, Rosita S.

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - • To study the effects of infusion of low doses of dopamine hydrochloride on cardiopulmonary and renal status in premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, 49 newborns were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (18 patients) received no dopamine and was the control group; group 2 (16 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 1.0 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours; and group 3 (15 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 2.5 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours. Birth weights, gestational ages, postnatal ages, and cardiopulmonary status of all groups at the start of the study were comparable. Continuous infusion of these low doses of dopamine for 3 days after birth did not significantly improve levels of blood gases, acid-base balance, or clinical outcome. In newborns with systemic hypotension, dopamine improved cardiovascular status and caused early return of blood pressure to the normal range. Infusion of low doses of dopamine produced mild to moderate natriuresis and insignificant increases in glomerular filtration rate and urine volume. (AJDC. 1991;145:799-803)

AB - • To study the effects of infusion of low doses of dopamine hydrochloride on cardiopulmonary and renal status in premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, 49 newborns were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (18 patients) received no dopamine and was the control group; group 2 (16 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 1.0 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours; and group 3 (15 patients) was infused with a dose of dopamine measuring 2.5 μg/kg of body weight per minute for 72 hours. Birth weights, gestational ages, postnatal ages, and cardiopulmonary status of all groups at the start of the study were comparable. Continuous infusion of these low doses of dopamine for 3 days after birth did not significantly improve levels of blood gases, acid-base balance, or clinical outcome. In newborns with systemic hypotension, dopamine improved cardiovascular status and caused early return of blood pressure to the normal range. Infusion of low doses of dopamine produced mild to moderate natriuresis and insignificant increases in glomerular filtration rate and urine volume. (AJDC. 1991;145:799-803)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942186194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942186194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160070095028

DO - 10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160070095028

M3 - Article

VL - 145

SP - 787

EP - 796

JO - JAMA Pediatrics

JF - JAMA Pediatrics

SN - 2168-6203

IS - 7

ER -