The effect of incentive spirometry on chest expansion and breathing work in patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases

comparison of two methods.

Shu-Chuan Ho, Ling-Ling Chiang, H. F. Cheng, Horng Chyuan Lin, D. F. Sheng, Han Pin Kuo, H. C. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive airway diseases (COAD), characterized by mucus hypersecretion, lead to exercise intolerance. Incentive spirometry has been used to prevent postoperative pulmonary atelectasis. METHODS: To compare the efficacy of two incentive spirometers, Coach (volume-oriented) and Triflo (flow-oriented), in the work of breathing in COAD patients, 22 patients were randomized in this study: 12 patients (Triflo-II group) initially used Triflo-II for 10 minutes and then Coach for the same period. In contrast, the Coach group, including 10 patients, started with Coach followed by Triflo-II. After receiving incentive spirometry, lung expansion and work of breathing were assessed. RESULTS: Patients in the Coach group significantly increased chest wall expansion (p = 0.041), as compared with patients using Triflo-II. Similarly, there was also a significantly increased abdominal wall expansion in the Coach group (p = 0.0056), compared with that in the Triflo-II group. The need of accessory muscle assistance for breathing in the Coach group was significantly less than in the Triflo-II group (p = 0.047). It was easier for patients in the Coach group to start a breath (p = 0.0058) than for those in the Triflo-II group. For the entire group, 17 patients (77.3%) preferred Coach to assist their breathing, and only 4 patients (18.2%) favored Triflo-II. CONCLUSION: COAD patients achieved a larger expansion of the chest and abdomen with a Coach device. Our data provide a good rationale for an outcome study on the use of incentive spirometer in COAD patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-79
Number of pages7
JournalChang Gung Medical Journal
Volume23
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2000

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Work of Breathing
Spirometry
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Motivation
Thorax
Respiration
Mentoring
Pulmonary Atelectasis
Abdominal Wall
Thoracic Wall
Mucus
Abdomen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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The effect of incentive spirometry on chest expansion and breathing work in patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases : comparison of two methods. / Ho, Shu-Chuan; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Cheng, H. F.; Lin, Horng Chyuan; Sheng, D. F.; Kuo, Han Pin; Lin, H. C.

In: Chang Gung Medical Journal, Vol. 23, No. 2, 02.2000, p. 73-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive airway diseases (COAD), characterized by mucus hypersecretion, lead to exercise intolerance. Incentive spirometry has been used to prevent postoperative pulmonary atelectasis. METHODS: To compare the efficacy of two incentive spirometers, Coach (volume-oriented) and Triflo (flow-oriented), in the work of breathing in COAD patients, 22 patients were randomized in this study: 12 patients (Triflo-II group) initially used Triflo-II for 10 minutes and then Coach for the same period. In contrast, the Coach group, including 10 patients, started with Coach followed by Triflo-II. After receiving incentive spirometry, lung expansion and work of breathing were assessed. RESULTS: Patients in the Coach group significantly increased chest wall expansion (p = 0.041), as compared with patients using Triflo-II. Similarly, there was also a significantly increased abdominal wall expansion in the Coach group (p = 0.0056), compared with that in the Triflo-II group. The need of accessory muscle assistance for breathing in the Coach group was significantly less than in the Triflo-II group (p = 0.047). It was easier for patients in the Coach group to start a breath (p = 0.0058) than for those in the Triflo-II group. For the entire group, 17 patients (77.3{\%}) preferred Coach to assist their breathing, and only 4 patients (18.2{\%}) favored Triflo-II. CONCLUSION: COAD patients achieved a larger expansion of the chest and abdomen with a Coach device. Our data provide a good rationale for an outcome study on the use of incentive spirometer in COAD patients.",
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