The effect of almonds on inflammation and oxidative stress in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized crossover controlled feeding trial

Jen Fang Liu, Yen Hua Liu, Chiao Ming Chen, Wen Hsin Chang, C. Y Oliver Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-week randomized, crossover, controlled feeding trial was that almond consumption would ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (9 M, 11 F; 58 years; BMI: 26 kg/m2) with mild hyperlipidemia. Methods: After a 2-week run-in period, the patients were assigned to either a control NCEP step II diet (control diet) or almond diet for 4 weeks with a 2-week washout period between alternative diets. Almonds approximately at 56 g/day were added to the control diet to replace 20 % of total daily calorie intake. Results: As compared to the control diet, the almond diet decreased IL-6 by a median 10.3 % (95 % confidence intervals 5.2, 12.6 %), CRP by a median 10.3 % (-24.1, 40.5), and TNF-α by a median 15.7 % (-0.3, 29.9). The almond diet also decreased plasma protein carbonyl by a median 28.2 % (4.7, 38.2) as compared to the C diet but did not alter plasma malondialdehyde. The A diet enhanced the resistance of LDL against Cu 2+-induced oxidation by a median 16.3 % (7.4, 44.3) as compared to the C diet. Serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1 were not changed by both diets. Conclusions: Our results suggested that incorporation of almonds into a healthy diet could ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with T2DM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)927-935
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Oxidative Stress
Diet
Inflammation
Hyperlipidemias
Prunus dulcis
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Malondialdehyde
Hyperglycemia
Blood Vessels
Blood Proteins
Interleukin-6
Obesity
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Almonds
  • Antioxidants
  • Inflammation
  • Oxidative stress
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The effect of almonds on inflammation and oxidative stress in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus : A randomized crossover controlled feeding trial. / Liu, Jen Fang; Liu, Yen Hua; Chen, Chiao Ming; Chang, Wen Hsin; Chen, C. Y Oliver.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 52, No. 3, 04.2013, p. 927-935.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Jen Fang ; Liu, Yen Hua ; Chen, Chiao Ming ; Chang, Wen Hsin ; Chen, C. Y Oliver. / The effect of almonds on inflammation and oxidative stress in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus : A randomized crossover controlled feeding trial. In: European Journal of Nutrition. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 927-935.
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AU - Chen, Chiao Ming

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AU - Chen, C. Y Oliver

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N2 - Purpose: Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-week randomized, crossover, controlled feeding trial was that almond consumption would ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (9 M, 11 F; 58 years; BMI: 26 kg/m2) with mild hyperlipidemia. Methods: After a 2-week run-in period, the patients were assigned to either a control NCEP step II diet (control diet) or almond diet for 4 weeks with a 2-week washout period between alternative diets. Almonds approximately at 56 g/day were added to the control diet to replace 20 % of total daily calorie intake. Results: As compared to the control diet, the almond diet decreased IL-6 by a median 10.3 % (95 % confidence intervals 5.2, 12.6 %), CRP by a median 10.3 % (-24.1, 40.5), and TNF-α by a median 15.7 % (-0.3, 29.9). The almond diet also decreased plasma protein carbonyl by a median 28.2 % (4.7, 38.2) as compared to the C diet but did not alter plasma malondialdehyde. The A diet enhanced the resistance of LDL against Cu 2+-induced oxidation by a median 16.3 % (7.4, 44.3) as compared to the C diet. Serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1 were not changed by both diets. Conclusions: Our results suggested that incorporation of almonds into a healthy diet could ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with T2DM.

AB - Purpose: Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-week randomized, crossover, controlled feeding trial was that almond consumption would ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (9 M, 11 F; 58 years; BMI: 26 kg/m2) with mild hyperlipidemia. Methods: After a 2-week run-in period, the patients were assigned to either a control NCEP step II diet (control diet) or almond diet for 4 weeks with a 2-week washout period between alternative diets. Almonds approximately at 56 g/day were added to the control diet to replace 20 % of total daily calorie intake. Results: As compared to the control diet, the almond diet decreased IL-6 by a median 10.3 % (95 % confidence intervals 5.2, 12.6 %), CRP by a median 10.3 % (-24.1, 40.5), and TNF-α by a median 15.7 % (-0.3, 29.9). The almond diet also decreased plasma protein carbonyl by a median 28.2 % (4.7, 38.2) as compared to the C diet but did not alter plasma malondialdehyde. The A diet enhanced the resistance of LDL against Cu 2+-induced oxidation by a median 16.3 % (7.4, 44.3) as compared to the C diet. Serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1 were not changed by both diets. Conclusions: Our results suggested that incorporation of almonds into a healthy diet could ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with T2DM.

KW - Almonds

KW - Antioxidants

KW - Inflammation

KW - Oxidative stress

KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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