The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry

Tamra Lysaght, Wendy Lipworth, Tereza Hendl, Ian Kerridge, Tsung Ling Lee, Megan Munsie, Catherine Waldby, Cameron Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2016, the Office of the State Coroner of New South Wales released its report into the death of an Australian woman, Sheila Drysdale, who had died from complications of an autologous stem cell procedure at a Sydney clinic. In this report, we argue that Mrs Drysdale's death was avoidable, and it was the result of a pernicious global problem of an industry exploiting regulatory systems to sell unproven and unjustified interventions with stem cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)744-746
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
Volume43
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Industry
Stem Cells
death
Coroners and Medical Examiners
New South Wales
industry
Clinic
Complications
Coroner

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Lysaght, T., Lipworth, W., Hendl, T., Kerridge, I., Lee, T. L., Munsie, M., ... Stewart, C. (2017). The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry. Journal of Medical Ethics, 43(11), 744-746. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2016-104046

The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry. / Lysaght, Tamra; Lipworth, Wendy; Hendl, Tereza; Kerridge, Ian; Lee, Tsung Ling; Munsie, Megan; Waldby, Catherine; Stewart, Cameron.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 43, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. 744-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lysaght, T, Lipworth, W, Hendl, T, Kerridge, I, Lee, TL, Munsie, M, Waldby, C & Stewart, C 2017, 'The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry', Journal of Medical Ethics, vol. 43, no. 11, pp. 744-746. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2016-104046
Lysaght, Tamra ; Lipworth, Wendy ; Hendl, Tereza ; Kerridge, Ian ; Lee, Tsung Ling ; Munsie, Megan ; Waldby, Catherine ; Stewart, Cameron. / The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry. In: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2017 ; Vol. 43, No. 11. pp. 744-746.
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