The correlations of incontinence-related quality of life measures with symptom severity and pathophysiology in women with primary stress urinary incontinence

Wen-Chen Huang, Shwu-Huey Yang, Shu Yu Yang, Evelyn Yang, Jenn-Ming Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We sought to explore the correlations of incontinence-related quality of life (QoL) measures with the symptom severity and pathophysiological factors for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 707 women who had primary SUI. Clinical data for analysis included Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, incontinence-related QoL questionnaires comprising short forms of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), ultrasound assessment of urethral support and urethral sphincter function determined by maximum urethral closure pressure and Valsalva leak point pressure. The correlations of incontinence-related QoL, measured by UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires, with the independent variables such as Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, urethral support and urethral sphincter function were investigated. Results: The scores of item 3 of UDI-6 as well as the sum scores of UDI-6 and IIQ-7 had significant correlation with incontinence severity assessed by Ingelman-Sundberg scales and 1-h pad tests. However, only the scores of item 3 of UDI-6 were significantly correlated with the presence of bladder neck funneling on ultrasound and maximum urethral closure pressure. No correlations exist between sum scores of UDI-6 or IIQ-7 and the pathophysiological factors of SUI. Conclusions: Urogenital Distress Inventory-6 and IIQ-7 play important and complementary roles in comprehensive assessment for SUI, but are not identical to the pathophysiological factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-623
Number of pages5
JournalWorld Journal of Urology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Stress Urinary Incontinence
Quality of Life
Urethra
Pressure
Incontinence Pads
Equipment and Supplies
Urinary Bladder
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Quality of life
  • Questionnaire
  • Stress urinary incontinence
  • Ultrasound
  • Urodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose: We sought to explore the correlations of incontinence-related quality of life (QoL) measures with the symptom severity and pathophysiological factors for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 707 women who had primary SUI. Clinical data for analysis included Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, incontinence-related QoL questionnaires comprising short forms of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), ultrasound assessment of urethral support and urethral sphincter function determined by maximum urethral closure pressure and Valsalva leak point pressure. The correlations of incontinence-related QoL, measured by UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires, with the independent variables such as Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, urethral support and urethral sphincter function were investigated. Results: The scores of item 3 of UDI-6 as well as the sum scores of UDI-6 and IIQ-7 had significant correlation with incontinence severity assessed by Ingelman-Sundberg scales and 1-h pad tests. However, only the scores of item 3 of UDI-6 were significantly correlated with the presence of bladder neck funneling on ultrasound and maximum urethral closure pressure. No correlations exist between sum scores of UDI-6 or IIQ-7 and the pathophysiological factors of SUI. Conclusions: Urogenital Distress Inventory-6 and IIQ-7 play important and complementary roles in comprehensive assessment for SUI, but are not identical to the pathophysiological factors.",
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AU - Yang, Evelyn

AU - Yang, Jenn-Ming

PY - 2010

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N2 - Purpose: We sought to explore the correlations of incontinence-related quality of life (QoL) measures with the symptom severity and pathophysiological factors for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 707 women who had primary SUI. Clinical data for analysis included Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, incontinence-related QoL questionnaires comprising short forms of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), ultrasound assessment of urethral support and urethral sphincter function determined by maximum urethral closure pressure and Valsalva leak point pressure. The correlations of incontinence-related QoL, measured by UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires, with the independent variables such as Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, urethral support and urethral sphincter function were investigated. Results: The scores of item 3 of UDI-6 as well as the sum scores of UDI-6 and IIQ-7 had significant correlation with incontinence severity assessed by Ingelman-Sundberg scales and 1-h pad tests. However, only the scores of item 3 of UDI-6 were significantly correlated with the presence of bladder neck funneling on ultrasound and maximum urethral closure pressure. No correlations exist between sum scores of UDI-6 or IIQ-7 and the pathophysiological factors of SUI. Conclusions: Urogenital Distress Inventory-6 and IIQ-7 play important and complementary roles in comprehensive assessment for SUI, but are not identical to the pathophysiological factors.

AB - Purpose: We sought to explore the correlations of incontinence-related quality of life (QoL) measures with the symptom severity and pathophysiological factors for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 707 women who had primary SUI. Clinical data for analysis included Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, incontinence-related QoL questionnaires comprising short forms of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), ultrasound assessment of urethral support and urethral sphincter function determined by maximum urethral closure pressure and Valsalva leak point pressure. The correlations of incontinence-related QoL, measured by UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires, with the independent variables such as Ingelman-Sundberg scales, 1-h pad tests, urethral support and urethral sphincter function were investigated. Results: The scores of item 3 of UDI-6 as well as the sum scores of UDI-6 and IIQ-7 had significant correlation with incontinence severity assessed by Ingelman-Sundberg scales and 1-h pad tests. However, only the scores of item 3 of UDI-6 were significantly correlated with the presence of bladder neck funneling on ultrasound and maximum urethral closure pressure. No correlations exist between sum scores of UDI-6 or IIQ-7 and the pathophysiological factors of SUI. Conclusions: Urogenital Distress Inventory-6 and IIQ-7 play important and complementary roles in comprehensive assessment for SUI, but are not identical to the pathophysiological factors.

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