The association between use of dietary supplements and headache or migraine complaints

Hsiao Yean Chiu, Pei Shan Tsai, Cheng Chi Lee, Yu Tse Liu, Hui-Chuan Huang, Pin Yuan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To examine the prevalence of headache or migraine complaints and the use of dietary supplements, and to determine their correlation according to sex. Methods This population-based cross-sectional study used data from a 2005 National Health Interview Survey of 15,414 participants (age 18-65 years) in Taiwan. Prevalence of headache or migraine complaints was accessed by a single question on their occurrence during the previous 3 months. Dietary supplement use was evaluated by another single question. Data were stratified by sex and analyzed using independent t-test, chi-square test, and multivariate logistic regression. Results The prevalence of headache or migraine complaints was 17.2% in males and 32.4% in females. The percentage of women taking supplements was 31.8%, which was much higher than the 15.5% of men. In male supplement users, use of isoflavones had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) of headache or migraine complaint compared with those of male without use of isoflavones (adjusted OR = 3.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.68-8.85). In females, vitamin B complex, vitamin C, and green algae supplement use had higher likelihoods of headache or migraine complaint in comparison to those of female without use of supplements (adjusted OR = 1.28, 1.21, and 1.43; 95% CI = 1.05-1.57, 1.03-1.42, and 1.07-1.90, respectively). Conclusions This population-based study confirmed sex-specific associations between headache or migraine complaints and the use of dietary supplements, warranting further investigation of the underlying causes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-363
Number of pages9
JournalHeadache
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Dietary Supplements
Migraine Disorders
Vitamin B Complex
Isoflavones
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Chlorophyta
Chi-Square Distribution
Health Surveys
Taiwan
Population
Ascorbic Acid
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Interviews

Keywords

  • headache
  • migraine
  • sex difference
  • use of dietary supplement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

The association between use of dietary supplements and headache or migraine complaints. / Chiu, Hsiao Yean; Tsai, Pei Shan; Lee, Cheng Chi; Liu, Yu Tse; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Pin Yuan.

In: Headache, Vol. 54, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 355-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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