Terminal cardiac electrical activity in adults who die without apparent cardiac disease

Fu Su Wang, Wen Pin Lien, Tsu Eng Fong, Jiunn Lee Lin, Jun Jack Cherng, Jyh Hong Chen, Jin Jer Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prolonged electrocardiographic (Holter) recording was performed to analyze terminal electrical events in 23 hospitalized adults who died without apparent cardiac disease. Most patients showed a gradual slowing of heart rate with shifting of cardiac pacemaker downward from the sinus node or atria to the atrioventricular junction and ventricles, resulting in cardiac asystole. Dominant bradyarrhythmia was more common than ventricular tachyarrhythmia (83 vs 17%). Agonal ST-segment elevation was not uncommon (26%). These terminal electrical events became manifest from 1 to 450 minutes (mean 62) before cessation of cardiac electrical activity. Forty-eight percent of the patients continued to show deteriorating sinus or atrial activity up to the last moment. The mechanism of bradycardiac asystole in patients with no apparent cardiac disease may be attributed to generalized anoxic and toxic depression of the sinus node and subsidiary pacemakers, together with neurogenic suppression of these structures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)491-495
Number of pages5
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Diseases
Sinoatrial Node
Heart Arrest
Poisons
Bradycardia
Tachycardia
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Terminal cardiac electrical activity in adults who die without apparent cardiac disease. / Wang, Fu Su; Lien, Wen Pin; Fong, Tsu Eng; Lin, Jiunn Lee; Cherng, Jun Jack; Chen, Jyh Hong; Chen, Jin Jer.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.09.1986, p. 491-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Fu Su ; Lien, Wen Pin ; Fong, Tsu Eng ; Lin, Jiunn Lee ; Cherng, Jun Jack ; Chen, Jyh Hong ; Chen, Jin Jer. / Terminal cardiac electrical activity in adults who die without apparent cardiac disease. In: The American Journal of Cardiology. 1986 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 491-495.
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