Editorial: Taking a hands-on approach: current perspectives on the effect of hand position on vision

Christopher C Davoli, Philip Tseng

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Over the past 10 years, perception scientists have uncovered a surprising connection between people's vision and their hands. There is now compelling evidence that how people perceive, attend to, think about, and remember visual information depends on how close they have their hands to that information. With their hands near, people perform figure-ground assignment more efficiently, parse temporally adjacent events more precisely, and hold more information in visual working memory. Near their hands, people also detect sudden visual onsets more quickly, but search through arrays of items more slowly, and take longer to switch between different ways of interpreting the same perceptual content (e.g., “seeing the forest” vs. “seeing the trees”). These are but some of the ways in which visual processing changes when people's hands are in proximity of viewed information—a host of effects that we refer to here, collectively, as hand-altered vision (HAV).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1231
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Hand
Short-Term Memory

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Editorial: Taking a hands-on approach: current perspectives on the effect of hand position on vision. / Davoli, Christopher C; Tseng, Philip.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 6, 2015, p. 1231.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

@article{c75f2f141a2d4f77900ff1e124b3b94b,
title = "Editorial: Taking a hands-on approach: current perspectives on the effect of hand position on vision",
abstract = "Over the past 10 years, perception scientists have uncovered a surprising connection between people's vision and their hands. There is now compelling evidence that how people perceive, attend to, think about, and remember visual information depends on how close they have their hands to that information. With their hands near, people perform figure-ground assignment more efficiently, parse temporally adjacent events more precisely, and hold more information in visual working memory. Near their hands, people also detect sudden visual onsets more quickly, but search through arrays of items more slowly, and take longer to switch between different ways of interpreting the same perceptual content (e.g., “seeing the forest” vs. “seeing the trees”). These are but some of the ways in which visual processing changes when people's hands are in proximity of viewed information—a host of effects that we refer to here, collectively, as hand-altered vision (HAV).",
keywords = "Journal Article, embodied cognition, multisensory integration, perception and action, affordance, proprioception",
author = "Davoli, {Christopher C} and Philip Tseng",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01231",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "1231",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Editorial: Taking a hands-on approach: current perspectives on the effect of hand position on vision

AU - Davoli, Christopher C

AU - Tseng, Philip

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Over the past 10 years, perception scientists have uncovered a surprising connection between people's vision and their hands. There is now compelling evidence that how people perceive, attend to, think about, and remember visual information depends on how close they have their hands to that information. With their hands near, people perform figure-ground assignment more efficiently, parse temporally adjacent events more precisely, and hold more information in visual working memory. Near their hands, people also detect sudden visual onsets more quickly, but search through arrays of items more slowly, and take longer to switch between different ways of interpreting the same perceptual content (e.g., “seeing the forest” vs. “seeing the trees”). These are but some of the ways in which visual processing changes when people's hands are in proximity of viewed information—a host of effects that we refer to here, collectively, as hand-altered vision (HAV).

AB - Over the past 10 years, perception scientists have uncovered a surprising connection between people's vision and their hands. There is now compelling evidence that how people perceive, attend to, think about, and remember visual information depends on how close they have their hands to that information. With their hands near, people perform figure-ground assignment more efficiently, parse temporally adjacent events more precisely, and hold more information in visual working memory. Near their hands, people also detect sudden visual onsets more quickly, but search through arrays of items more slowly, and take longer to switch between different ways of interpreting the same perceptual content (e.g., “seeing the forest” vs. “seeing the trees”). These are but some of the ways in which visual processing changes when people's hands are in proximity of viewed information—a host of effects that we refer to here, collectively, as hand-altered vision (HAV).

KW - Journal Article

KW - embodied cognition

KW - multisensory integration

KW - perception and action

KW - affordance

KW - proprioception

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01231

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01231

M3 - Editorial

VL - 6

SP - 1231

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

ER -