TAK1 inhibition-induced RIP1-dependent apoptosis in murine macrophages relies on constitutive TNF-α signaling and ROS production

Jang Shiun Wang, Dean Wu, Duen Yi Huang, Wan-Wan Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key regulator of signal cascades of TNF-α receptor and TLR4, and can induce NF-κB activation for preventing cell apoptosis and eliciting inflammation response. Results: TAK1 inhibitor (TAKI) can decrease the cell viability of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), RAW264.7 and BV-2 cells, but not dermal microvascular endothelial cells, normal human epidermal keratinocytes, THP-1 monocytes, human retinal pigment epithelial cells, microglia CHME3 cells, and some cancer cell lines (CL1.0, HeLa and HCT116). In BMDM, TAKI-induced caspase activation and cell apoptosis were enhanced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, TAKI treatment increased the cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ROS scavengers NAC and BHA can inhibit cell death caused by TAKI. In addition, RIP1 inhibitor (necrostatin-1) can protect cells against TAKI-induced mitochondrial ROS production and cell apoptosis. We also observed the mitochondrial membrane potential loss after TAKI treatment and deterioration of oxygen consumption upon combination with LPS. Notably TNF-α neutralization antibody and inhibitor enbrel can decrease the cell death caused by TAKI. Conclusions: TAKI-induced cytotoxicity is cell context specific, and apoptosis observed in macrophages is dependent on the constitutive autocrine action of TNF-α for RIP1 activation and ROS production.

Original languageEnglish
Article number182
JournalJournal of Biomedical Science
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 2015

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Macrophages
Reactive Oxygen Species
Phosphotransferases
Apoptosis
Chemical activation
Cell death
Lipopolysaccharides
Bone
Cells
Butylated Hydroxyanisole
Retinal Pigments
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Endothelial cells
Transforming Growth Factors
Cytotoxicity
Caspases
Cell Death
Deterioration
Oxygen
Caspase Inhibitors

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Macrophages
  • RIP1
  • ROS
  • TAK1
  • TNF-α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

TAK1 inhibition-induced RIP1-dependent apoptosis in murine macrophages relies on constitutive TNF-α signaling and ROS production. / Wang, Jang Shiun; Wu, Dean; Huang, Duen Yi; Lin, Wan-Wan.

In: Journal of Biomedical Science, Vol. 22, No. 1, 182, 18.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key regulator of signal cascades of TNF-α receptor and TLR4, and can induce NF-κB activation for preventing cell apoptosis and eliciting inflammation response. Results: TAK1 inhibitor (TAKI) can decrease the cell viability of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), RAW264.7 and BV-2 cells, but not dermal microvascular endothelial cells, normal human epidermal keratinocytes, THP-1 monocytes, human retinal pigment epithelial cells, microglia CHME3 cells, and some cancer cell lines (CL1.0, HeLa and HCT116). In BMDM, TAKI-induced caspase activation and cell apoptosis were enhanced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, TAKI treatment increased the cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ROS scavengers NAC and BHA can inhibit cell death caused by TAKI. In addition, RIP1 inhibitor (necrostatin-1) can protect cells against TAKI-induced mitochondrial ROS production and cell apoptosis. We also observed the mitochondrial membrane potential loss after TAKI treatment and deterioration of oxygen consumption upon combination with LPS. Notably TNF-α neutralization antibody and inhibitor enbrel can decrease the cell death caused by TAKI. Conclusions: TAKI-induced cytotoxicity is cell context specific, and apoptosis observed in macrophages is dependent on the constitutive autocrine action of TNF-α for RIP1 activation and ROS production.

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