Surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume and outcomes of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 12-year nationwide study

Chun Ku Chen, Hsiao Ting Chang, Yu Chun Chen, Tzeng Ji Chen, I. Ming Chen, Chun Che Shih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair. Methods: A nationwide claims database was used to identify patients who underwent rAAA repair from 1998 to 2009. Surgeon elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EAR) volume was classified as low, medium, or high. Associations between surgeon EAR volume and in-hospital mortality, overall survival, and complications after open rAAA repair (RAR) were compared with multivariate analysis. Associations between surgeon elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EER) volume and outcomes after endovascular rAAA repair (RER) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 537 patients who underwent rAAA repair were identified, including 498 who underwent RAR and 39 who underwent RER. In-hospital mortality rates after RAR were 49, 38, and 24 % in the low, medium, and high EAR volume groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group had higher in-hospital mortality than those in the high surgeon EAR volume group [odds ratio 3.39, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.52, 7.59; p = 0.003]. Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group also had higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.86, 95 % CI 1.21, 2.85; p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in complication rates among the surgeon EAR volume groups or in-hospital mortality after RER among the surgeon EER volume groups. Conclusions: Surgeon EAR volume is associated with in-hospital mortality and long-term survival after RAR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2360-2371
Number of pages12
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Aortic Rupture
compound A 12
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Hospital Mortality
Surgeons
Confidence Intervals
Survival
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume and outcomes of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair : A 12-year nationwide study. / Chen, Chun Ku; Chang, Hsiao Ting; Chen, Yu Chun; Chen, Tzeng Ji; Chen, I. Ming; Shih, Chun Che.

In: World Journal of Surgery, Vol. 37, No. 10, 01.10.2013, p. 2360-2371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Chun Ku ; Chang, Hsiao Ting ; Chen, Yu Chun ; Chen, Tzeng Ji ; Chen, I. Ming ; Shih, Chun Che. / Surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume and outcomes of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair : A 12-year nationwide study. In: World Journal of Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 10. pp. 2360-2371.
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abstract = "Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair. Methods: A nationwide claims database was used to identify patients who underwent rAAA repair from 1998 to 2009. Surgeon elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EAR) volume was classified as low, medium, or high. Associations between surgeon EAR volume and in-hospital mortality, overall survival, and complications after open rAAA repair (RAR) were compared with multivariate analysis. Associations between surgeon elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EER) volume and outcomes after endovascular rAAA repair (RER) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 537 patients who underwent rAAA repair were identified, including 498 who underwent RAR and 39 who underwent RER. In-hospital mortality rates after RAR were 49, 38, and 24 {\%} in the low, medium, and high EAR volume groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group had higher in-hospital mortality than those in the high surgeon EAR volume group [odds ratio 3.39, 95 {\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.52, 7.59; p = 0.003]. Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group also had higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.86, 95 {\%} CI 1.21, 2.85; p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in complication rates among the surgeon EAR volume groups or in-hospital mortality after RER among the surgeon EER volume groups. Conclusions: Surgeon EAR volume is associated with in-hospital mortality and long-term survival after RAR.",
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N2 - Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair. Methods: A nationwide claims database was used to identify patients who underwent rAAA repair from 1998 to 2009. Surgeon elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EAR) volume was classified as low, medium, or high. Associations between surgeon EAR volume and in-hospital mortality, overall survival, and complications after open rAAA repair (RAR) were compared with multivariate analysis. Associations between surgeon elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EER) volume and outcomes after endovascular rAAA repair (RER) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 537 patients who underwent rAAA repair were identified, including 498 who underwent RAR and 39 who underwent RER. In-hospital mortality rates after RAR were 49, 38, and 24 % in the low, medium, and high EAR volume groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group had higher in-hospital mortality than those in the high surgeon EAR volume group [odds ratio 3.39, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.52, 7.59; p = 0.003]. Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group also had higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.86, 95 % CI 1.21, 2.85; p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in complication rates among the surgeon EAR volume groups or in-hospital mortality after RER among the surgeon EER volume groups. Conclusions: Surgeon EAR volume is associated with in-hospital mortality and long-term survival after RAR.

AB - Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of surgeon elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair volume on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair. Methods: A nationwide claims database was used to identify patients who underwent rAAA repair from 1998 to 2009. Surgeon elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EAR) volume was classified as low, medium, or high. Associations between surgeon EAR volume and in-hospital mortality, overall survival, and complications after open rAAA repair (RAR) were compared with multivariate analysis. Associations between surgeon elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EER) volume and outcomes after endovascular rAAA repair (RER) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 537 patients who underwent rAAA repair were identified, including 498 who underwent RAR and 39 who underwent RER. In-hospital mortality rates after RAR were 49, 38, and 24 % in the low, medium, and high EAR volume groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group had higher in-hospital mortality than those in the high surgeon EAR volume group [odds ratio 3.39, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.52, 7.59; p = 0.003]. Patients in the low surgeon EAR volume group also had higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.86, 95 % CI 1.21, 2.85; p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in complication rates among the surgeon EAR volume groups or in-hospital mortality after RER among the surgeon EER volume groups. Conclusions: Surgeon EAR volume is associated with in-hospital mortality and long-term survival after RAR.

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