Successful treatment of drug-induced acute liver failure with high-volume plasma exchange

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Abstract

We report two patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-related acute liver failure (ALF) who were successfully treated with high-volume plasma exchange without liver transplantation. The first patient was a 66-year-old man admitted because of a perforated duodenal ulcer complicated with peritonitis and septic shock. After treatment with multiple antibiotics, the patient developed DILI and ALF. Grade 3 hepatic encephalopathy and profound jaundice were present. Symptoms and signs of ALF improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange. The patient was discharged uneventfully. The second patient was a 94-year-old man admitted for treatment of newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. DILI and ALF developed 5 days after initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Grade 4 hepatic encephalopathy was present. After plasma exchange, the patient's level of consciousness improved dramatically, and he recovered from ALF. These 2 cases show the potential of plasma exchange in the treatment of DILI despite occurrence acute liver failure. J. Clin. Apheresis, 28:430-434, 2013.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-434
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Apheresis
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Plasma Exchange
Acute Liver Failure
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Hepatic Encephalopathy
Therapeutics
Blood Component Removal
Duodenal Ulcer
Septic Shock
Jaundice
Peritonitis
Consciousness
Pulmonary Tuberculosis
Liver Transplantation
Signs and Symptoms
Tuberculosis
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • acute liver failure
  • artificial liver support
  • drug-induced liver injury
  • plasma exchange

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

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title = "Successful treatment of drug-induced acute liver failure with high-volume plasma exchange",
abstract = "We report two patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-related acute liver failure (ALF) who were successfully treated with high-volume plasma exchange without liver transplantation. The first patient was a 66-year-old man admitted because of a perforated duodenal ulcer complicated with peritonitis and septic shock. After treatment with multiple antibiotics, the patient developed DILI and ALF. Grade 3 hepatic encephalopathy and profound jaundice were present. Symptoms and signs of ALF improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange. The patient was discharged uneventfully. The second patient was a 94-year-old man admitted for treatment of newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. DILI and ALF developed 5 days after initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Grade 4 hepatic encephalopathy was present. After plasma exchange, the patient's level of consciousness improved dramatically, and he recovered from ALF. These 2 cases show the potential of plasma exchange in the treatment of DILI despite occurrence acute liver failure. J. Clin. Apheresis, 28:430-434, 2013.",
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N2 - We report two patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-related acute liver failure (ALF) who were successfully treated with high-volume plasma exchange without liver transplantation. The first patient was a 66-year-old man admitted because of a perforated duodenal ulcer complicated with peritonitis and septic shock. After treatment with multiple antibiotics, the patient developed DILI and ALF. Grade 3 hepatic encephalopathy and profound jaundice were present. Symptoms and signs of ALF improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange. The patient was discharged uneventfully. The second patient was a 94-year-old man admitted for treatment of newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. DILI and ALF developed 5 days after initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Grade 4 hepatic encephalopathy was present. After plasma exchange, the patient's level of consciousness improved dramatically, and he recovered from ALF. These 2 cases show the potential of plasma exchange in the treatment of DILI despite occurrence acute liver failure. J. Clin. Apheresis, 28:430-434, 2013.

AB - We report two patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-related acute liver failure (ALF) who were successfully treated with high-volume plasma exchange without liver transplantation. The first patient was a 66-year-old man admitted because of a perforated duodenal ulcer complicated with peritonitis and septic shock. After treatment with multiple antibiotics, the patient developed DILI and ALF. Grade 3 hepatic encephalopathy and profound jaundice were present. Symptoms and signs of ALF improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange. The patient was discharged uneventfully. The second patient was a 94-year-old man admitted for treatment of newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. DILI and ALF developed 5 days after initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Grade 4 hepatic encephalopathy was present. After plasma exchange, the patient's level of consciousness improved dramatically, and he recovered from ALF. These 2 cases show the potential of plasma exchange in the treatment of DILI despite occurrence acute liver failure. J. Clin. Apheresis, 28:430-434, 2013.

KW - acute liver failure

KW - artificial liver support

KW - drug-induced liver injury

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