Strain-dependent induction of allergic sensitization caused by peanut allergen DNA immunization in mice

Xiu Min Li, Chih Kang Huang, Brian H. Schofield, A. Wesley Burks, Gary A. Bannon, Kawn Hyoung Kim, Shau Ku Huang, Hugh A. Sampson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the potential application of allergen gene immunization in the modulation of food allergy, C3H/HeSn (C3H) mice received i.m. injections of pAra h2 plasmid DNA encoding one of the major peanut allergens, Ara h2. Three weeks following pDNA immunization, serum Ara h2-specific IgG2a, IgG1, but not IgE, were increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. IgG1 was 30-fold higher in multiply compared with singly immunized mice. Ara h2 or peanut protein injection of immunized mice induced anaphylactic reactions, which were more severe in multiply immunized mice. Heat- inactivated immune serum induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, suggesting that anaphylaxis in C3H mice was mediated by IgG1. IgG1 responses were also induced by intradermal injection of pAra h2, and by i.m. injection of pOMC, the plasmid DNA encoding the major egg allergen protein, ovomucoid. To elucidate whether the pDNA immunization-induced anaphylaxis was a strain- dependent phenomenon, AKR/J and BALB/c mice also received multiple i.m. pAra h2 immunizations. Injection of peanut protein into these strains at weeks 3 or 5 following immunization did not induce reactions. Although IgG2a was increased significantly from week 2 in AKR/J mice and from week 4 in BALB/c mice and remained elevated for at least 6 wk, no IgG1 or IgE was detected. These results indicate that the type of immune responses to pDNA immunization in mice is strain dependent. Consequently, models for studying human allergen gene immunization require careful selection of suitable strains. In addition, this suggests that similar interindividual variation is likely in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3045-3052
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume162
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Strain-dependent induction of allergic sensitization caused by peanut allergen DNA immunization in mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this