Sleep trajectories of women undergoing elective cesarean section: Effects on body weight and psychological well-being

Ya Ling Tzeng, Shu Ling Chen, Chuen Fei Chen, Fong Chen Wang, Shu Yu Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: After cesarean section (CS), women may be at great risk for sleep disturbance, but little is known about temporal changes in their sleep patterns and characteristics. We had two aims: 1) to identify distinct classes of sleep-disturbance trajectories in women considering elective CS from third-trimester pregnancy to 6 months post-CS and 2) to examine associations of sleep trajectories with body mass index (BMI), depressive symptoms, and fatigue scores. Methods: We analyzed data from a prospective cohort study of 139 Taiwanese pregnant women who elected CS. Sleep components were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in third-trimester pregnancy, 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months post-CS. Data were collected on depressive symptoms, fatigue symptoms, and BMI. Sleep-quality trajectories were identified by group-based trajectory modeling. Results: We identified three distinct trajectories: stable poor sleep (50 women, 36.0%), progressively worse sleep (67 women, 48.2%), and persistently poor sleep (22 women, 15.8%). Poor sleep was significantly associated with pre-pregnancy BMI and more baseline (thirdtrimester pregnancy) depressive and fatigue symptoms. At 6 months post-CS, women classified as progressively worse or persistently poor sleepers showed a trend toward higher BMI (p

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0129094
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 12 2015

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cesarean section
sleep
Cesarean Section
trajectories
Sleep
Body Weight
Trajectories
Psychology
body weight
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
body mass index
Body Mass Index
pregnancy
Fatigue
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Fatigue of materials
Depression
Pregnancy
pregnant women
cohort studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sleep trajectories of women undergoing elective cesarean section : Effects on body weight and psychological well-being. / Tzeng, Ya Ling; Chen, Shu Ling; Chen, Chuen Fei; Wang, Fong Chen; Kuo, Shu Yu.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 6, e0129094, 12.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tzeng, Ya Ling ; Chen, Shu Ling ; Chen, Chuen Fei ; Wang, Fong Chen ; Kuo, Shu Yu. / Sleep trajectories of women undergoing elective cesarean section : Effects on body weight and psychological well-being. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 6.
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