Site-directed mutagenesis of double-stranded plasmids, domain substitution, and marker rescue by comutagenesis of restriction enzyme sites.

J. A. Nickoloff, W. P. Deng, E. M. Miller, F. A. Ray

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis can be used to introduce specific alterations in cloned DNA, including base-pair substitutions, insertions and deletions. It is an important procedure in studies of gene expression and protein structure/function relationships. A variety of protocols have been developed to mutate specific bases in plasmid DNA, all of which involve annealing oligonucleotide primers with specific mutations to target sequences. Primer-directed DNA synthesis creates a DNA strand containing the desired mutation that may segregate from the wild-type template strand during DNA replication following transformation into an E. coli host. Although the theoretical yield of mutant products is 50%, the actual yield is usually much lower, necessitating strategies for enriching for products derived from the mutant strand. Two successful strategies for mutant enrichment involved the in vivo degradation of wild-type strands containing uracil bases in place of thymidine and selection of mutant strands carrying a second mutation that creates a functional selectable marker, such as the β-lactamase gene. Systems that involve secondary selectable mutations depend on coupling of two primers during DNA synthesis, and are improved by the use of T4 DNA polymerase rather than the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase, since the T4 enzyme does not displace the mutagenic primers
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBasic DNA and RNA Protocols
PublisherHumana Press
Pages455-468
Number of pages14
Volume58
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Site-Directed Mutagenesis
DNA Primers
Plasmids
Mutation
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Enzymes
DNA
Escherichia coli
DNA Polymerase I
Uracil
DNA Replication
Base Pairing
Thymidine
Gene Expression
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Nickoloff, J. A., Deng, W. P., Miller, E. M., & Ray, F. A. (1996). Site-directed mutagenesis of double-stranded plasmids, domain substitution, and marker rescue by comutagenesis of restriction enzyme sites. In Basic DNA and RNA Protocols (Vol. 58, pp. 455-468). Humana Press.

Site-directed mutagenesis of double-stranded plasmids, domain substitution, and marker rescue by comutagenesis of restriction enzyme sites. / Nickoloff, J. A.; Deng, W. P.; Miller, E. M.; Ray, F. A.

Basic DNA and RNA Protocols. Vol. 58 Humana Press, 1996. p. 455-468.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Nickoloff, JA, Deng, WP, Miller, EM & Ray, FA 1996, Site-directed mutagenesis of double-stranded plasmids, domain substitution, and marker rescue by comutagenesis of restriction enzyme sites. in Basic DNA and RNA Protocols. vol. 58, Humana Press, pp. 455-468.
Nickoloff JA, Deng WP, Miller EM, Ray FA. Site-directed mutagenesis of double-stranded plasmids, domain substitution, and marker rescue by comutagenesis of restriction enzyme sites. In Basic DNA and RNA Protocols. Vol. 58. Humana Press. 1996. p. 455-468
Nickoloff, J. A. ; Deng, W. P. ; Miller, E. M. ; Ray, F. A. / Site-directed mutagenesis of double-stranded plasmids, domain substitution, and marker rescue by comutagenesis of restriction enzyme sites. Basic DNA and RNA Protocols. Vol. 58 Humana Press, 1996. pp. 455-468
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