Shear Stress Induces Differentiation of Endothelial Lineage Cells to Protect Neonatal Brain from Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through NRP1 and VEGFR2 Signaling

Chia Wei Huang, Chao Ching Huang, Yuh Ling Chen, Shih Chen Fan, Yuan Yu Hsueh, Chien Jung Ho, Chia Ching Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injuries disrupt the integrity of neurovascular structure and lead to lifelong neurological deficit. The devastating damage can be ameliorated by preserving the endothelial network, but the source for therapeutic cells is limited. We aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of mechanical shear stress in the differentiation of endothelial lineage cells (ELCs) from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and the possible intracellular signals to protect HI injury using cell-based therapy in the neonatal rats. The ASCs expressed early endothelial markers after biochemical stimulation of endothelial growth medium. The ELCs with full endothelial characteristics were accomplished after a subsequential shear stress application for 24 hours. When comparing the therapeutic potential of ASCs and ELCs, the ELCs treatment significantly reduced the infarction area and preserved neurovascular architecture in HI injured brain. The transplanted ELCs can migrate and engraft into the brain tissue, especially in vessels, where they promoted the angiogenesis. The activation of Akt by neuropilin 1 (NRP1) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) was important for ELC migration and following in vivo therapeutic outcomes. Therefore, the current study demonstrated importance of mechanical factor in stem cell differentiation and showed promising protection of brain from HI injury using ELCs treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number862485
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Neuropilin-1
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2
Endothelial cells
Shear stress
Brain
Endothelial Cells
Stem cells
Wounds and Injuries
Stem Cells
Cell Lineage
Therapeutics
Mechanical Stress
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Brain Injuries
Infarction
Cell Movement
Rats
Cell Differentiation
Biomarkers
Chemical activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Shear Stress Induces Differentiation of Endothelial Lineage Cells to Protect Neonatal Brain from Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through NRP1 and VEGFR2 Signaling. / Huang, Chia Wei; Huang, Chao Ching; Chen, Yuh Ling; Fan, Shih Chen; Hsueh, Yuan Yu; Ho, Chien Jung; Wu, Chia Ching.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2015, 862485, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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