Sex differences in how erotic and painful stimuli impair inhibitory control

Jiaxin Yu, Daisy L. Hung, Philip Tseng, Ovid J L Tzeng, Neil G. Muggleton, Chi Hung Juan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Witnessing emotional events such as arousal or pain may impair ongoing cognitive processes such as inhibitory control. We found that this may be true only half of the time. Erotic images and painful video clips were shown to men and women shortly before a stop signal task, which measures cognitive inhibitory control. These stimuli impaired inhibitory control only in men and not in women, suggesting that emotional stimuli may be processed with different weights depending on gender.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-255
Number of pages5
JournalCognition
Volume124
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sex Characteristics
stimulus
Arousal
Surgical Instruments
video clip
Weights and Measures
Pain
pain
event
gender
Inhibitory Control
Stimulus
Sex Differences
Emotion
time
Cognitive Processes
Witnessing

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Response inhibition
  • Sex difference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Yu, J., Hung, D. L., Tseng, P., Tzeng, O. J. L., Muggleton, N. G., & Juan, C. H. (2012). Sex differences in how erotic and painful stimuli impair inhibitory control. Cognition, 124(2), 251-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2012.04.007

Sex differences in how erotic and painful stimuli impair inhibitory control. / Yu, Jiaxin; Hung, Daisy L.; Tseng, Philip; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Muggleton, Neil G.; Juan, Chi Hung.

In: Cognition, Vol. 124, No. 2, 08.2012, p. 251-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, J, Hung, DL, Tseng, P, Tzeng, OJL, Muggleton, NG & Juan, CH 2012, 'Sex differences in how erotic and painful stimuli impair inhibitory control', Cognition, vol. 124, no. 2, pp. 251-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2012.04.007
Yu, Jiaxin ; Hung, Daisy L. ; Tseng, Philip ; Tzeng, Ovid J L ; Muggleton, Neil G. ; Juan, Chi Hung. / Sex differences in how erotic and painful stimuli impair inhibitory control. In: Cognition. 2012 ; Vol. 124, No. 2. pp. 251-255.
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