Serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) levels in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities

Jin Ding Lin, Pei Ying Lin, Li Mei Chen, Wen Hui Fang, Lan Ping Lin, Ching Hui Loh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The elevated serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) rate among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is unknown and have not been sufficiently studies. The present paper aims to provide the profile of GOT and GPT, and their associated relationship with other biochemical levels of children or adolescents with ID. A cross-sectional design was conducted in three Taiwanese public special schools to analyze annual health examination chart of students with ID. There were 1041 aged 3-21 years children and adolescents with ID participated in the study. The results show elevated rate of GOT and GPT were 3.7% and 7.2%, the study indicates the elevated GPT in children and adolescents with ID is higher than the general school aged children in Taiwan. In multiple linear regression models show that the factors of BMI, HBsAg, TC and UA can significantly explain the GOT value (R2 = 0.275). Those factors of gender, BMI, HBsAg, TC and UA can significantly explain 44.4% variation of GPT value (R2 = 0.444). To prevent the further liver disease burden in people with ID, the study highlights that the health care professionals should assess liver functions of this group of people, and to inform their caregivers the importance of implement regular liver health check-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-177
Number of pages6
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT)
  • Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT)
  • Intellectual disability
  • Liver function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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