Seroepidemiology of Toxocara canis infection among mountain aboriginal schoolchildren living in contaminated districts in eastern Taiwan

Chia-Kwung Fan, C. C. Hung, W. Y. Du, Chien-Wei Liao, K. E. Su

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a seroepidemiological study of Toxocara canis infection among mountain aboriginal schoolchildren aged 7-12 years living in contaminated districts in eastern Taiwan, To detect sera IgG (≥1:64) we used a T. canis larval excretory-secretory antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A short questionnaire elicited information on the practices of raising dogs, playing with soil, eating raw vegetables, or whether the child normally washed his/her hands before eating. The overall seroprevalence was quite high, reaching 76.6% (252/329). Neither age nor gender seemed to be important factors related to a positive serology. Aboriginal schoolchildren who raised dogs (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.04-3.19, P = 0.03), or played with soil (OR = 2.52, 95% CI: 1.49-4.25, P <0.001) seemed to be more susceptible to T. canis infection than those who did not. Children who habitually washed their hands before eating (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.33-0.97, P = 0.04) had a lower chance of acquiring T. canis infection than those who did not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1312-1318
Number of pages7
JournalTropical Medicine and International Health
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

Fingerprint

Toxocara canis
Taiwan
Eating
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Infection
Soil
Hand
Dogs
Serology
Vegetables
Immunoglobulin G
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Antigens
Serum

Keywords

  • Aboriginal schoolchildren
  • Eastern Taiwan
  • Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay
  • Toxocara canis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology
  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "We conducted a seroepidemiological study of Toxocara canis infection among mountain aboriginal schoolchildren aged 7-12 years living in contaminated districts in eastern Taiwan, To detect sera IgG (≥1:64) we used a T. canis larval excretory-secretory antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A short questionnaire elicited information on the practices of raising dogs, playing with soil, eating raw vegetables, or whether the child normally washed his/her hands before eating. The overall seroprevalence was quite high, reaching 76.6{\%} (252/329). Neither age nor gender seemed to be important factors related to a positive serology. Aboriginal schoolchildren who raised dogs (OR = 1.83, 95{\%} CI: 1.04-3.19, P = 0.03), or played with soil (OR = 2.52, 95{\%} CI: 1.49-4.25, P <0.001) seemed to be more susceptible to T. canis infection than those who did not. Children who habitually washed their hands before eating (OR = 0.57, 95{\%} CI: 0.33-0.97, P = 0.04) had a lower chance of acquiring T. canis infection than those who did not.",
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AU - Liao, Chien-Wei

AU - Su, K. E.

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