Seasonality of pneumonia admissions and its association with climate

An eight-year nationwide population-based study

Herng Ching Lin, Hsiu Chen Lin, Ching Chun Lin, Chin Shyan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine seasonal variability in monthly admissions for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Taiwan. Our study sample comprised 477,541 pneumonia patients in Taiwan between 1998 and 2005, inclusive. Results showed a fairly consistent seasonal pattern of pneumonia admissions, regardless of sex and age, and for the groups combined. Seasonal trends showed a peak in hospitalizations from January through April, followed by a sharp decrease in May and a trough from August through October. The auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) test found significant seasonality for all age and sex groups and for the whole sample (all p <0.001). After adjusting for seasonality, month, and trends, the ARIMA regression models revealed that the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with ambient temperature, for the total sample, for female groups, and for the 65-74 and ≥ 75 age groups (all p <0.01). A 1°C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with roughly a 0.03 increase in monthly pneumonia admissions rate (per 10,000 people) for the entire sample. We conclude the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with seasonality, and was higher in periods with low ambient temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1647-1659
Number of pages13
JournalChronobiology International
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

Fingerprint

Climate
Pneumonia
Population
Age Groups
Taiwan
Temperature
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • Ambient temperature
  • Climate
  • Pneumonia
  • Seasonality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Seasonality of pneumonia admissions and its association with climate : An eight-year nationwide population-based study. / Lin, Herng Ching; Lin, Hsiu Chen; Lin, Ching Chun; Chen, Chin Shyan.

In: Chronobiology International, Vol. 26, No. 8, 12.2009, p. 1647-1659.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{db71de85258745b186df78b60d0ba268,
title = "Seasonality of pneumonia admissions and its association with climate: An eight-year nationwide population-based study",
abstract = "The aim of the study was to examine seasonal variability in monthly admissions for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Taiwan. Our study sample comprised 477,541 pneumonia patients in Taiwan between 1998 and 2005, inclusive. Results showed a fairly consistent seasonal pattern of pneumonia admissions, regardless of sex and age, and for the groups combined. Seasonal trends showed a peak in hospitalizations from January through April, followed by a sharp decrease in May and a trough from August through October. The auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) test found significant seasonality for all age and sex groups and for the whole sample (all p <0.001). After adjusting for seasonality, month, and trends, the ARIMA regression models revealed that the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with ambient temperature, for the total sample, for female groups, and for the 65-74 and ≥ 75 age groups (all p <0.01). A 1°C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with roughly a 0.03 increase in monthly pneumonia admissions rate (per 10,000 people) for the entire sample. We conclude the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with seasonality, and was higher in periods with low ambient temperatures.",
keywords = "Ambient temperature, Climate, Pneumonia, Seasonality",
author = "Lin, {Herng Ching} and Lin, {Hsiu Chen} and Lin, {Ching Chun} and Chen, {Chin Shyan}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
doi = "10.3109/07420520903520673",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1647--1659",
journal = "Annual Review of Chronopharmacology",
issn = "0743-9539",
publisher = "Marcel Dekker Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seasonality of pneumonia admissions and its association with climate

T2 - An eight-year nationwide population-based study

AU - Lin, Herng Ching

AU - Lin, Hsiu Chen

AU - Lin, Ching Chun

AU - Chen, Chin Shyan

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - The aim of the study was to examine seasonal variability in monthly admissions for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Taiwan. Our study sample comprised 477,541 pneumonia patients in Taiwan between 1998 and 2005, inclusive. Results showed a fairly consistent seasonal pattern of pneumonia admissions, regardless of sex and age, and for the groups combined. Seasonal trends showed a peak in hospitalizations from January through April, followed by a sharp decrease in May and a trough from August through October. The auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) test found significant seasonality for all age and sex groups and for the whole sample (all p <0.001). After adjusting for seasonality, month, and trends, the ARIMA regression models revealed that the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with ambient temperature, for the total sample, for female groups, and for the 65-74 and ≥ 75 age groups (all p <0.01). A 1°C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with roughly a 0.03 increase in monthly pneumonia admissions rate (per 10,000 people) for the entire sample. We conclude the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with seasonality, and was higher in periods with low ambient temperatures.

AB - The aim of the study was to examine seasonal variability in monthly admissions for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Taiwan. Our study sample comprised 477,541 pneumonia patients in Taiwan between 1998 and 2005, inclusive. Results showed a fairly consistent seasonal pattern of pneumonia admissions, regardless of sex and age, and for the groups combined. Seasonal trends showed a peak in hospitalizations from January through April, followed by a sharp decrease in May and a trough from August through October. The auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) test found significant seasonality for all age and sex groups and for the whole sample (all p <0.001). After adjusting for seasonality, month, and trends, the ARIMA regression models revealed that the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with ambient temperature, for the total sample, for female groups, and for the 65-74 and ≥ 75 age groups (all p <0.01). A 1°C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with roughly a 0.03 increase in monthly pneumonia admissions rate (per 10,000 people) for the entire sample. We conclude the monthly pneumonia admissions rate was significantly associated with seasonality, and was higher in periods with low ambient temperatures.

KW - Ambient temperature

KW - Climate

KW - Pneumonia

KW - Seasonality

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73649119542&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73649119542&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/07420520903520673

DO - 10.3109/07420520903520673

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 1647

EP - 1659

JO - Annual Review of Chronopharmacology

JF - Annual Review of Chronopharmacology

SN - 0743-9539

IS - 8

ER -