Satellite microwave remote sensing for environmental modeling of mosquito population dynamics

Ting Wu Chuang, Geoffrey M. Henebry, John S. Kimball, Denise L. VanRoekel-Patton, Michael B. Hildreth, Michael C. Wimberly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Environmental variability has important influences on mosquito life cycles and understanding the spatial and temporal patterns of mosquito populations is critical for mosquito control and vector-borne disease prevention. Meteorological data used for model-based predictions of mosquito abundance and life cycle dynamics are typically acquired from ground-based weather stations; however, data availability and completeness are often limited by sparse networks and resource availability. In contrast, environmental measurements from satellite remote sensing are more spatially continuous and can be retrieved automatically. This study compared environmental measurements from the NASA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E) and in situ weather station data to examine their ability to predict the abundance of two important mosquito species (Aedes vexans and Culex tarsalis) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA from 2005 to 2010. The AMSR-E land parameters included daily surface water inundation fraction, surface air temperature, soil moisture, and microwave vegetation opacity. The AMSR-E derived models had better fits and higher forecasting accuracy than models based on weather station data despite the relatively coarse (25-km) spatial resolution of the satellite data. In the AMSR-E models, air temperature and surface water fraction were the best predictors of Aedes vexans, whereas air temperature and vegetation opacity were the best predictors of Cx. tarsalis abundance. The models were used to extrapolate spatial, seasonal, and interannual patterns of climatic suitability for mosquitoes across eastern South Dakota. Our findings demonstrate that environmental metrics derived from satellite passive microwave radiometry are suitable for predicting mosquito population dynamics and can potentially improve the effectiveness of mosquito-borne disease early warning systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-156
Number of pages10
JournalRemote Sensing of Environment
Volume125
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

environmental modeling
Population dynamics
Earth Observing System
mosquito
remote sensing
Remote sensing
population dynamics
Culicidae
radiometers
Microwaves
Satellites
Radiometers
weather stations
EOS
Aedes vexans
radiometer
Scanning
air temperature
weather station
opacity

Keywords

  • AMSR-E
  • Mosquito
  • Public Health
  • Weather Station
  • West Nile Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Soil Science
  • Geology

Cite this

Chuang, T. W., Henebry, G. M., Kimball, J. S., VanRoekel-Patton, D. L., Hildreth, M. B., & Wimberly, M. C. (2012). Satellite microwave remote sensing for environmental modeling of mosquito population dynamics. Remote Sensing of Environment, 125, 147-156. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2012.07.018

Satellite microwave remote sensing for environmental modeling of mosquito population dynamics. / Chuang, Ting Wu; Henebry, Geoffrey M.; Kimball, John S.; VanRoekel-Patton, Denise L.; Hildreth, Michael B.; Wimberly, Michael C.

In: Remote Sensing of Environment, Vol. 125, 10.2012, p. 147-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chuang, Ting Wu ; Henebry, Geoffrey M. ; Kimball, John S. ; VanRoekel-Patton, Denise L. ; Hildreth, Michael B. ; Wimberly, Michael C. / Satellite microwave remote sensing for environmental modeling of mosquito population dynamics. In: Remote Sensing of Environment. 2012 ; Vol. 125. pp. 147-156.
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