Risk Factors for Recurrent Injuries from Physical Violence Among African Men in The Gambia

Paul Bass, Wen Yu Yu, Edrisa Sanyang, Mau Roung Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While men are known to be at high risk of recurrent injuries from physical violence, the risk factors in African men have not been investigated. We conducted a matched case-control study to identify factors associated with recurrent injuries from physical violence in The Gambia. Eligible participants were injured male patients aged ≥ 15 years. Over the 12-month study period, 257 cases with recurrent injuries from physical violence, and 257 control patients each from two control groups (violence controls and nonviolence controls) were recruited from eight emergency rooms located in six districts of the Greater Banjul Metropolitan Area, The Gambia. The two control groups matched cases at the same health facility, date of injury, and age, in which violence controls (VCs) experienced only one violence-related injury in the past 12 months and nonviolence controls (NCs) experienced no violence-related injuries. Results of the multivariable conditional logistic regression showed that for both the VC and NC groups, a polygamous family (OR VC , 3.62; OR NC , 2.79), > 8 family members (OR VC , 5.60; OR NC , 4.81), being brought up by a family relative (OR VC , 5.17; OR NC , 2.11), having smoked cigarettes in the past week (OR VC , 3.53; OR NC , 4.03), and perceiving no family support (OR VC , 1.12; OR NC , 1.19) were significantly associated with the occurrence of recurrent violent injuries. Furthermore, compared to the NCs, three additional factors of > 2 male siblings (OR NC , 1.84), low household income (OR NC , 3.11), and alcohol consumption in the past week (OR NC , 4.66) were significantly associated with the occurrence of recurrent violent injuries. These findings may fill in a knowledge gap that will be beneficial for developing effective intervention programs to reduce recurrent injuries from physical violence among African men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)596-604
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 2019

Fingerprint

Gambia
Violence
violence
Wounds and Injuries
Domestic Violence
Control Groups
Physical Abuse
Health Facilities
Tobacco Products
Alcohol Drinking
Case-Control Studies
Hospital Emergency Service
Siblings
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Emergency room
  • Men
  • Physical violence
  • Recurrent injuries
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Risk Factors for Recurrent Injuries from Physical Violence Among African Men in The Gambia. / Bass, Paul; Yu, Wen Yu; Sanyang, Edrisa; Lin, Mau Roung.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 44, No. 3, 15.06.2019, p. 596-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "While men are known to be at high risk of recurrent injuries from physical violence, the risk factors in African men have not been investigated. We conducted a matched case-control study to identify factors associated with recurrent injuries from physical violence in The Gambia. Eligible participants were injured male patients aged ≥ 15 years. Over the 12-month study period, 257 cases with recurrent injuries from physical violence, and 257 control patients each from two control groups (violence controls and nonviolence controls) were recruited from eight emergency rooms located in six districts of the Greater Banjul Metropolitan Area, The Gambia. The two control groups matched cases at the same health facility, date of injury, and age, in which violence controls (VCs) experienced only one violence-related injury in the past 12 months and nonviolence controls (NCs) experienced no violence-related injuries. Results of the multivariable conditional logistic regression showed that for both the VC and NC groups, a polygamous family (OR VC , 3.62; OR NC , 2.79), > 8 family members (OR VC , 5.60; OR NC , 4.81), being brought up by a family relative (OR VC , 5.17; OR NC , 2.11), having smoked cigarettes in the past week (OR VC , 3.53; OR NC , 4.03), and perceiving no family support (OR VC , 1.12; OR NC , 1.19) were significantly associated with the occurrence of recurrent violent injuries. Furthermore, compared to the NCs, three additional factors of > 2 male siblings (OR NC , 1.84), low household income (OR NC , 3.11), and alcohol consumption in the past week (OR NC , 4.66) were significantly associated with the occurrence of recurrent violent injuries. These findings may fill in a knowledge gap that will be beneficial for developing effective intervention programs to reduce recurrent injuries from physical violence among African men.",
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