Risk factors for crash involvement in older motorcycle riders

Sy Jou Chen, Chih Yi Chen, Mau Roung Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A prospective cohort study was conducted to identify risk and protective factors for crash involvement in older motorcyclists. Over a 1-year study period from August 2013 to July 2014, study participants were recruited from local community centers of five cities in Taiwan. People aged ≥60 years who rode a motorcycle at least once per week were eligible and were invited to participate in the study. Among 256 older riders who completed the baseline assessment and at least one of the four follow-up assessments, 79 (33.7%) experienced a motorcycle crash over the study period. Results of the proportional hazards model showed that after controlling for age, gender, and riding distance, older riders who had sustained hearing impairment (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.58; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.30–5.15), rode a motorcycle at speeds of ≥41 km/h (HR = 2.31; 95% CI, 1.26–4.23), and had experienced a motorcycle crash in the past year (HR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.06–3.09) were more likely to be involved in a crash, compared to their counterparts. Conversely, older riders who were obese (HR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.22–0.82) were less likely to be involved in a crash than those with a normal weight, while longer functional reach distances (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93–0.99) and higher Tinetti balance scores (HR = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69–0.91) were associated with a reduced risk of crash involvement. Among older people riding a motorcycle as their primary source of transportation, several factors associated with the occurrence of motorcycle crashes were identified. Restrictions and modifications of these risk factors may help design effective safety interventions for reducing crash and injury risks of this increasing riding population.

LanguageEnglish
Pages109-114
Number of pages6
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume111
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Motorcycles
motorcycle
Hazards
confidence
Confidence Intervals
community center
hearing impairment
Taiwan
Hearing Loss
Proportional Hazards Models
Audition
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Safety
Weights and Measures
gender
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Keywords

  • Balance
  • Hearing impairment
  • Motorcycle injury
  • Obesity
  • Older people

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Law

Cite this

Risk factors for crash involvement in older motorcycle riders. / Chen, Sy Jou; Chen, Chih Yi; Lin, Mau Roung.

In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 111, 01.02.2018, p. 109-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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