Abstract

Objectives: Fourteen-day rehospitalization with new traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) diagnosis is used as an indicator for the diagnostic quality of the first hospitalization. In this nationwide population-based cohort study, we identified risk factors for this indicator. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study by using the data of patients who received a first hospitalization for trauma between 2001 and 2011. The data were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Variables including demographic and trauma characteristics were compared between patients diagnosed with tSCI at the first hospitalization and those receiving a 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis. Results: Of the 23 617 tSCI patients, 997 had 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis (incidence rate, 4.22%). The risk of 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis was significantly lower in patients with severe (injury severity score [ISS] = 16–24; odds ratio [OR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13–0.21) and profound (ISS > 24; OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.07–0.18) injuries. Interhospital transfer (OR, 8.20; 95% CI, 6.48–10.38) was a significant risk factor, along with injuries at the thoracic (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.21–2.18), lumbar (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02–1.65), and multiple (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.86–5.61) levels. Brain (OR, 2.82), chest (OR, 2.99), and abdominal (OR, 2.74) injuries were also identified as risk factors. In addition, the risk was higher in patients treated at the orthopedic department (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.78–2.87) and those of other surgical disciplines (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.57–2.28) than in those treated at the neurosurgery department. Conclusions: Delayed tSCI diagnoses are not uncommon, particularly among trauma patients with ISSs < 16 or those who are transferred from lower-level hospitals. Further validation and implementation of evidence-based decision rules is essential for improving the diagnostic quality of traumatic thoracolumbar SCI.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0184253
JournalPLoS One
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2017

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national surveys
antineoplaston A10
Spinal Cord Injuries
Taiwan
spinal cord
odds ratio
risk factors
Odds Ratio
confidence interval
Wounds and Injuries
Confidence Intervals
Injury Severity Score
Hospitalization
Health insurance
Neurosurgery
chest
Orthopedics
health insurance
Brain
Thoracic Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{5d4a10f87c5a41dc8b381867353f0d23,
title = "Risk factors for 14-day rehospitalization following trauma with new traumatic spinal cord injury diagnosis: A 10-year nationwide study in Taiwan",
abstract = "Objectives: Fourteen-day rehospitalization with new traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) diagnosis is used as an indicator for the diagnostic quality of the first hospitalization. In this nationwide population-based cohort study, we identified risk factors for this indicator. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study by using the data of patients who received a first hospitalization for trauma between 2001 and 2011. The data were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Variables including demographic and trauma characteristics were compared between patients diagnosed with tSCI at the first hospitalization and those receiving a 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis. Results: Of the 23 617 tSCI patients, 997 had 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis (incidence rate, 4.22{\%}). The risk of 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis was significantly lower in patients with severe (injury severity score [ISS] = 16–24; odds ratio [OR], 0.17; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.13–0.21) and profound (ISS > 24; OR, 0.11; 95{\%} CI, 0.07–0.18) injuries. Interhospital transfer (OR, 8.20; 95{\%} CI, 6.48–10.38) was a significant risk factor, along with injuries at the thoracic (OR, 1.62; 95{\%} CI, 1.21–2.18), lumbar (OR, 1.30; 95{\%} CI, 1.02–1.65), and multiple (OR, 3.23; 95{\%} CI, 1.86–5.61) levels. Brain (OR, 2.82), chest (OR, 2.99), and abdominal (OR, 2.74) injuries were also identified as risk factors. In addition, the risk was higher in patients treated at the orthopedic department (OR, 2.26; 95{\%} CI, 1.78–2.87) and those of other surgical disciplines (OR, 1.89; 95{\%} CI, 1.57–2.28) than in those treated at the neurosurgery department. Conclusions: Delayed tSCI diagnoses are not uncommon, particularly among trauma patients with ISSs < 16 or those who are transferred from lower-level hospitals. Further validation and implementation of evidence-based decision rules is essential for improving the diagnostic quality of traumatic thoracolumbar SCI.",
author = "Carlos Lam and Chen, {Ping Ling} and Kang, {Jiunn Horng} and Cheng, {Kuang Fu} and Chen, {Ray Jade} and Hung, {Kuo Sheng}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0184253",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors for 14-day rehospitalization following trauma with new traumatic spinal cord injury diagnosis

T2 - A 10-year nationwide study in Taiwan

AU - Lam, Carlos

AU - Chen, Ping Ling

AU - Kang, Jiunn Horng

AU - Cheng, Kuang Fu

AU - Chen, Ray Jade

AU - Hung, Kuo Sheng

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Objectives: Fourteen-day rehospitalization with new traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) diagnosis is used as an indicator for the diagnostic quality of the first hospitalization. In this nationwide population-based cohort study, we identified risk factors for this indicator. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study by using the data of patients who received a first hospitalization for trauma between 2001 and 2011. The data were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Variables including demographic and trauma characteristics were compared between patients diagnosed with tSCI at the first hospitalization and those receiving a 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis. Results: Of the 23 617 tSCI patients, 997 had 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis (incidence rate, 4.22%). The risk of 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis was significantly lower in patients with severe (injury severity score [ISS] = 16–24; odds ratio [OR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13–0.21) and profound (ISS > 24; OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.07–0.18) injuries. Interhospital transfer (OR, 8.20; 95% CI, 6.48–10.38) was a significant risk factor, along with injuries at the thoracic (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.21–2.18), lumbar (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02–1.65), and multiple (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.86–5.61) levels. Brain (OR, 2.82), chest (OR, 2.99), and abdominal (OR, 2.74) injuries were also identified as risk factors. In addition, the risk was higher in patients treated at the orthopedic department (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.78–2.87) and those of other surgical disciplines (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.57–2.28) than in those treated at the neurosurgery department. Conclusions: Delayed tSCI diagnoses are not uncommon, particularly among trauma patients with ISSs < 16 or those who are transferred from lower-level hospitals. Further validation and implementation of evidence-based decision rules is essential for improving the diagnostic quality of traumatic thoracolumbar SCI.

AB - Objectives: Fourteen-day rehospitalization with new traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) diagnosis is used as an indicator for the diagnostic quality of the first hospitalization. In this nationwide population-based cohort study, we identified risk factors for this indicator. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study by using the data of patients who received a first hospitalization for trauma between 2001 and 2011. The data were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Variables including demographic and trauma characteristics were compared between patients diagnosed with tSCI at the first hospitalization and those receiving a 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis. Results: Of the 23 617 tSCI patients, 997 had 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis (incidence rate, 4.22%). The risk of 14-day rehospitalization with new tSCI diagnosis was significantly lower in patients with severe (injury severity score [ISS] = 16–24; odds ratio [OR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13–0.21) and profound (ISS > 24; OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.07–0.18) injuries. Interhospital transfer (OR, 8.20; 95% CI, 6.48–10.38) was a significant risk factor, along with injuries at the thoracic (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.21–2.18), lumbar (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02–1.65), and multiple (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.86–5.61) levels. Brain (OR, 2.82), chest (OR, 2.99), and abdominal (OR, 2.74) injuries were also identified as risk factors. In addition, the risk was higher in patients treated at the orthopedic department (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.78–2.87) and those of other surgical disciplines (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.57–2.28) than in those treated at the neurosurgery department. Conclusions: Delayed tSCI diagnoses are not uncommon, particularly among trauma patients with ISSs < 16 or those who are transferred from lower-level hospitals. Further validation and implementation of evidence-based decision rules is essential for improving the diagnostic quality of traumatic thoracolumbar SCI.

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