Risk assessment of adverse birth outcomes in relation to maternal age

Yi Hao Weng, Chun Yuh Yang, Ya Wen Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Method: National population-based data containing maternal and neonatal information were derived from the Health Promotion Administration, Taiwan. A composite adverse birth outcome was defined as at least anyone of stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight, macrosomia, neonatal death, congenital anomaly, and small for gestational age (SGA). Singletons were further analyzed for outcomes of live birth in relation to each year of maternal age. A log-binomial model was used to adjust for possible confounders of maternal and neonatal factors.

Background: Although a number of studies have investigated correlations of maternal age with birth outcomes, an extensive assessment using age as a continuous variable is lacking. In the current study, we estimated age-specific risks of adverse birth outcomes in childbearing women.

Results: In total, 2,123,751 births between 2001 and 2010 were utilized in the analysis. The risk of a composite adverse birth outcome was significantly higher at extreme maternal ages. In specific, risks of stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm birth, congenital anomaly, and low birth weight were higher at the extremes of maternal age. Furthermore, risk of macrosomia rose proportionally with an increasing maternal age. In contrast, risk of SGA declined proportionally with an increasing maternal age. The log-binomial model showed greater risks at the maternal ages of ,26 and . 30 years for a composite adverse birth outcome.

Conclusions: Infants born to teenagers and women at advanced age possess greater risks for stillbirth, preterm birth, neonatal death, congenital anomaly, and low birth weight. Pregnancies at advanced age carry an additional risk for macrosomia, while teenage pregnancies carry an additional risk for SGA. The data suggest that the optimal maternal ages to minimize adverse birth outcomes are 26,30 years.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere114843
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 10 2014

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Maternal Age
Risk assessment
risk assessment
Parturition
small for gestational age
Stillbirth
premature birth
Premature Birth
Low Birth Weight Infant
low birth weight
fetal death
Gestational Age
Statistical Models
death
Composite materials
Mothers
pregnant adolescents
Pregnancy in Adolescence
health promotion
Live Birth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Risk assessment of adverse birth outcomes in relation to maternal age. / Weng, Yi Hao; Yang, Chun Yuh; Chiu, Ya Wen.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 12, e114843, 10.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weng, Yi Hao ; Yang, Chun Yuh ; Chiu, Ya Wen. / Risk assessment of adverse birth outcomes in relation to maternal age. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 12.
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