Resting state glutamate predicts elevated pre-stimulus alpha during self-relatedness: A combined EEG-MRS study on “rest-self overlap”

Y. Bai, Takashi Nakao, Jiameng Xu, Pengmin Qin, Pedro Chaves, Alexander Heinzel, Niall Duncan, Timothy Lane, Nai Shing Yen, Shang Yueh Tsai, Georg Northoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated neural overlap between resting state activity and self-referential processing. This “rest-self” overlap occurs especially in anterior cortical midline structures like the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC). However, the exact neurotemporal and biochemical mechanisms remain to be identified. Therefore, we conducted a combined electroencephalography (EEG)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study. EEG focused on pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) power changes to assess the degree to which those changes can predict subjects’ perception (and judgment) of subsequent stimuli as high or low self-related. MRS measured resting state concentration of glutamate, focusing on PACC. High pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) alpha power significantly correlated with both perception of stimuli judged to be highly self-related and with resting state glutamate concentrations in the PACC. In sum, our results show (i) pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) alpha power and resting state glutamate concentration to mediate rest-self overlap that (ii) dispose or incline subjects to assign high degrees of self-relatedness to perceptual stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-263
Number of pages15
JournalSocial Neuroscience
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Ego
relatedness
Glutamic Acid
Electroencephalography
stimulus
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
spectroscopy
Gyrus Cinguli
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • EEG
  • Glutamine
  • MRS
  • Perigenual anterior cingulate cortex
  • Self-referential processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Development
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Resting state glutamate predicts elevated pre-stimulus alpha during self-relatedness : A combined EEG-MRS study on “rest-self overlap”. / Bai, Y.; Nakao, Takashi; Xu, Jiameng; Qin, Pengmin; Chaves, Pedro; Heinzel, Alexander; Duncan, Niall; Lane, Timothy; Yen, Nai Shing; Tsai, Shang Yueh; Northoff, Georg.

In: Social Neuroscience, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2016, p. 249-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bai, Y. ; Nakao, Takashi ; Xu, Jiameng ; Qin, Pengmin ; Chaves, Pedro ; Heinzel, Alexander ; Duncan, Niall ; Lane, Timothy ; Yen, Nai Shing ; Tsai, Shang Yueh ; Northoff, Georg. / Resting state glutamate predicts elevated pre-stimulus alpha during self-relatedness : A combined EEG-MRS study on “rest-self overlap”. In: Social Neuroscience. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 249-263.
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