Resistance rates to commonly used antimicrobials among pathogens of both bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection

Sheung Mei Lau, Ming Yieh Peng, Feng Yee Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the distribution of organisms and their antimicrobial resistance in patients admitted due to acute bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI). During a period of 1 year and 1 month, a total of 201 patients and 253 bacterial isolates were studied. Fever higher than 38.5°C was significantly more common in the bacteremic group than the non-bacteremic group (68% vs 48%; p<0.05). Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were the most common organisms isolated. E. coli was the leading pathogen and it was significantly more predominant in bacteremic UTI than non-bacteremic UTI (73% vs 49%; p<0.01). Bacteria other than E. coli (i.e., K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., Acinetobacter baumannii, Serratia marcescens, and Providencia spp.) were more common in non-bacteremic UTI than bacteremic UTI (44% vs 22%; p<0.01). E. coli isolated from both bacteremic and non-bacteremic patients had a high rate of resistance to ampicillin (80%), cephalothin (59%), gentamicin (29%), piperacillin (61%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (34%), and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (36%). Isolates of P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and Proteus spp. from the non-bacteremic group showed a higher proportion of resistance to extended-pectrum cephalosporins, aminoglycosides (netilmicin and amikacin) and ciprofloxacin. The emergence of a high rate of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials (ampicillin, cephalothin, gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, piperacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid) may have an impact on the antibiotic treatment of patients admitted due to acute community-acquired bacteremic or non-bacteremic UTI in Taiwan. Further studies are needed to clarify the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the outcome in these conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-191
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection
Volume37
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Community-Acquired Infections
Urinary Tract Infections
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Escherichia coli
Cephalothin
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination
Proteus
Piperacillin
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Gentamicins
Morganella morganii
Providencia
Citrobacter
Netilmicin
Ampicillin Resistance
Enterobacter cloacae
Acinetobacter baumannii
Proteus mirabilis
Serratia marcescens

Keywords

  • Antibacterial agents
  • Bacteremia
  • Microbial drug resistance
  • Urinary tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

@article{3e283a5285724c34912d5686e6f1f9e4,
title = "Resistance rates to commonly used antimicrobials among pathogens of both bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection",
abstract = "This study examined the distribution of organisms and their antimicrobial resistance in patients admitted due to acute bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI). During a period of 1 year and 1 month, a total of 201 patients and 253 bacterial isolates were studied. Fever higher than 38.5°C was significantly more common in the bacteremic group than the non-bacteremic group (68{\%} vs 48{\%}; p<0.05). Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were the most common organisms isolated. E. coli was the leading pathogen and it was significantly more predominant in bacteremic UTI than non-bacteremic UTI (73{\%} vs 49{\%}; p<0.01). Bacteria other than E. coli (i.e., K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., Acinetobacter baumannii, Serratia marcescens, and Providencia spp.) were more common in non-bacteremic UTI than bacteremic UTI (44{\%} vs 22{\%}; p<0.01). E. coli isolated from both bacteremic and non-bacteremic patients had a high rate of resistance to ampicillin (80{\%}), cephalothin (59{\%}), gentamicin (29{\%}), piperacillin (61{\%}), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56{\%}), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (34{\%}), and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (36{\%}). Isolates of P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and Proteus spp. from the non-bacteremic group showed a higher proportion of resistance to extended-pectrum cephalosporins, aminoglycosides (netilmicin and amikacin) and ciprofloxacin. The emergence of a high rate of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials (ampicillin, cephalothin, gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, piperacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid) may have an impact on the antibiotic treatment of patients admitted due to acute community-acquired bacteremic or non-bacteremic UTI in Taiwan. Further studies are needed to clarify the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the outcome in these conditions.",
keywords = "Antibacterial agents, Bacteremia, Microbial drug resistance, Urinary tract infection",
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T1 - Resistance rates to commonly used antimicrobials among pathogens of both bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection

AU - Lau, Sheung Mei

AU - Peng, Ming Yieh

AU - Chang, Feng Yee

PY - 2004/6/1

Y1 - 2004/6/1

N2 - This study examined the distribution of organisms and their antimicrobial resistance in patients admitted due to acute bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI). During a period of 1 year and 1 month, a total of 201 patients and 253 bacterial isolates were studied. Fever higher than 38.5°C was significantly more common in the bacteremic group than the non-bacteremic group (68% vs 48%; p<0.05). Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were the most common organisms isolated. E. coli was the leading pathogen and it was significantly more predominant in bacteremic UTI than non-bacteremic UTI (73% vs 49%; p<0.01). Bacteria other than E. coli (i.e., K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., Acinetobacter baumannii, Serratia marcescens, and Providencia spp.) were more common in non-bacteremic UTI than bacteremic UTI (44% vs 22%; p<0.01). E. coli isolated from both bacteremic and non-bacteremic patients had a high rate of resistance to ampicillin (80%), cephalothin (59%), gentamicin (29%), piperacillin (61%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (34%), and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (36%). Isolates of P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and Proteus spp. from the non-bacteremic group showed a higher proportion of resistance to extended-pectrum cephalosporins, aminoglycosides (netilmicin and amikacin) and ciprofloxacin. The emergence of a high rate of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials (ampicillin, cephalothin, gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, piperacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid) may have an impact on the antibiotic treatment of patients admitted due to acute community-acquired bacteremic or non-bacteremic UTI in Taiwan. Further studies are needed to clarify the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the outcome in these conditions.

AB - This study examined the distribution of organisms and their antimicrobial resistance in patients admitted due to acute bacteremic and non-bacteremic community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI). During a period of 1 year and 1 month, a total of 201 patients and 253 bacterial isolates were studied. Fever higher than 38.5°C was significantly more common in the bacteremic group than the non-bacteremic group (68% vs 48%; p<0.05). Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were the most common organisms isolated. E. coli was the leading pathogen and it was significantly more predominant in bacteremic UTI than non-bacteremic UTI (73% vs 49%; p<0.01). Bacteria other than E. coli (i.e., K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., Acinetobacter baumannii, Serratia marcescens, and Providencia spp.) were more common in non-bacteremic UTI than bacteremic UTI (44% vs 22%; p<0.01). E. coli isolated from both bacteremic and non-bacteremic patients had a high rate of resistance to ampicillin (80%), cephalothin (59%), gentamicin (29%), piperacillin (61%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (34%), and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (36%). Isolates of P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and Proteus spp. from the non-bacteremic group showed a higher proportion of resistance to extended-pectrum cephalosporins, aminoglycosides (netilmicin and amikacin) and ciprofloxacin. The emergence of a high rate of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials (ampicillin, cephalothin, gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, piperacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid) may have an impact on the antibiotic treatment of patients admitted due to acute community-acquired bacteremic or non-bacteremic UTI in Taiwan. Further studies are needed to clarify the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the outcome in these conditions.

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KW - Bacteremia

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KW - Urinary tract infection

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