Residual Gastric Volume after Bowel Preparation with Polyethylene Glycol for Elective Colonoscopy

Chi Liang Cheng, Nai Jen Liu, Jui-Hsiang Tang, Yen Lin Kuo, Cheng Hui Lin, Yi Ning Tsui, Bai Ping Lee, Yun Chiu Tai, Ming Yao Su, Cheng Tang Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Goal: To examine the residual gastric volume (RGV) in colonoscopy after bowel preparations with 3-L polyethylene glycol (PEG). Background: Obstacles to high-volume bowel preparation by anesthesia providers resulting from concerns over aspiration risk are common during colonoscopy. Study: Prospective measurements of RGV were performed in patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and morning colonoscopy with split-dose PEG preparation, patients undergoing EGD and afternoon colonoscopy with same-day PEG preparation, and patients undergoing EGD alone under moderate conscious sedation. Colonoscopy patients were allowed to ingest clear liquids until 2 hours before the procedure. Patients undergoing EGD alone were instructed to eat/drink nothing after midnight. Results: There were 860 evaluated patients, including 330 in the split-dose preparation group, 100 in the same-day preparation group, and 430 in the EGD-only group. Baseline demographics and disease/medication factors were similar. The mean RGV in patients receiving the same-day preparation (35.4 mL or 0.56 mL/kg) was significantly higher than that in patients receiving the split-dose preparation (28.5 mL or 0.45 mL/kg) and in patients undergoing EGD alone (22.8 mL or 0.36 mL/kg) (P=0.023 and P<0.0001, respectively). Within the bowel-preparation groups, patients with fasting times of 2 to 3 hours had similar RGV compared with patients who had fasting times >3 hours. The shape of the distribution and the range of RGV among the 3 study groups were similar. No aspiration occurred in any group. Conclusions: PEG bowel preparations increase RGV mildly, but seem to have no clinical significance. These results support the current fasting guidelines for colonoscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-338
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Gastric Stump
Residual Volume
Colonoscopy
Digestive System Endoscopy
Conscious Sedation
Fasting
Anesthesia
Demography
Prospective Studies
Guidelines

Keywords

  • aspiration
  • colonoscopy
  • conscious sedation
  • polyethylene glycol
  • residual gastric volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Residual Gastric Volume after Bowel Preparation with Polyethylene Glycol for Elective Colonoscopy. / Cheng, Chi Liang; Liu, Nai Jen; Tang, Jui-Hsiang; Kuo, Yen Lin; Lin, Cheng Hui; Tsui, Yi Ning; Lee, Bai Ping; Tai, Yun Chiu; Su, Ming Yao; Chiu, Cheng Tang.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.01.2017, p. 331-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, Chi Liang ; Liu, Nai Jen ; Tang, Jui-Hsiang ; Kuo, Yen Lin ; Lin, Cheng Hui ; Tsui, Yi Ning ; Lee, Bai Ping ; Tai, Yun Chiu ; Su, Ming Yao ; Chiu, Cheng Tang. / Residual Gastric Volume after Bowel Preparation with Polyethylene Glycol for Elective Colonoscopy. In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2017 ; Vol. 51, No. 4. pp. 331-338.
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AU - Cheng, Chi Liang

AU - Liu, Nai Jen

AU - Tang, Jui-Hsiang

AU - Kuo, Yen Lin

AU - Lin, Cheng Hui

AU - Tsui, Yi Ning

AU - Lee, Bai Ping

AU - Tai, Yun Chiu

AU - Su, Ming Yao

AU - Chiu, Cheng Tang

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N2 - Goal: To examine the residual gastric volume (RGV) in colonoscopy after bowel preparations with 3-L polyethylene glycol (PEG). Background: Obstacles to high-volume bowel preparation by anesthesia providers resulting from concerns over aspiration risk are common during colonoscopy. Study: Prospective measurements of RGV were performed in patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and morning colonoscopy with split-dose PEG preparation, patients undergoing EGD and afternoon colonoscopy with same-day PEG preparation, and patients undergoing EGD alone under moderate conscious sedation. Colonoscopy patients were allowed to ingest clear liquids until 2 hours before the procedure. Patients undergoing EGD alone were instructed to eat/drink nothing after midnight. Results: There were 860 evaluated patients, including 330 in the split-dose preparation group, 100 in the same-day preparation group, and 430 in the EGD-only group. Baseline demographics and disease/medication factors were similar. The mean RGV in patients receiving the same-day preparation (35.4 mL or 0.56 mL/kg) was significantly higher than that in patients receiving the split-dose preparation (28.5 mL or 0.45 mL/kg) and in patients undergoing EGD alone (22.8 mL or 0.36 mL/kg) (P=0.023 and P<0.0001, respectively). Within the bowel-preparation groups, patients with fasting times of 2 to 3 hours had similar RGV compared with patients who had fasting times >3 hours. The shape of the distribution and the range of RGV among the 3 study groups were similar. No aspiration occurred in any group. Conclusions: PEG bowel preparations increase RGV mildly, but seem to have no clinical significance. These results support the current fasting guidelines for colonoscopy.

AB - Goal: To examine the residual gastric volume (RGV) in colonoscopy after bowel preparations with 3-L polyethylene glycol (PEG). Background: Obstacles to high-volume bowel preparation by anesthesia providers resulting from concerns over aspiration risk are common during colonoscopy. Study: Prospective measurements of RGV were performed in patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and morning colonoscopy with split-dose PEG preparation, patients undergoing EGD and afternoon colonoscopy with same-day PEG preparation, and patients undergoing EGD alone under moderate conscious sedation. Colonoscopy patients were allowed to ingest clear liquids until 2 hours before the procedure. Patients undergoing EGD alone were instructed to eat/drink nothing after midnight. Results: There were 860 evaluated patients, including 330 in the split-dose preparation group, 100 in the same-day preparation group, and 430 in the EGD-only group. Baseline demographics and disease/medication factors were similar. The mean RGV in patients receiving the same-day preparation (35.4 mL or 0.56 mL/kg) was significantly higher than that in patients receiving the split-dose preparation (28.5 mL or 0.45 mL/kg) and in patients undergoing EGD alone (22.8 mL or 0.36 mL/kg) (P=0.023 and P<0.0001, respectively). Within the bowel-preparation groups, patients with fasting times of 2 to 3 hours had similar RGV compared with patients who had fasting times >3 hours. The shape of the distribution and the range of RGV among the 3 study groups were similar. No aspiration occurred in any group. Conclusions: PEG bowel preparations increase RGV mildly, but seem to have no clinical significance. These results support the current fasting guidelines for colonoscopy.

KW - aspiration

KW - colonoscopy

KW - conscious sedation

KW - polyethylene glycol

KW - residual gastric volume

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