Relative efficacy of weight management, exercise, and combined treatment for muscle mass and physical sarcopenia indices in adults with overweight or obesity and osteoarthritis: A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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Abstract

Aging and osteoarthritis are associated with high risk of muscle mass loss, which leads to physical disability; this loss can be effectively alleviated by diet (DI) and exercise (ET) interventions. This study investigated the relative effects of different types of diet, exercise, and combined treatment (DI + ET) on muscle mass and functional outcomes in individuals with obesity and lower-limb osteoarthritis. A comprehensive search of online databases was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy of DI, ET, and DI + ET in patients with obesity and lower-extremity osteoarthritis. The included RCTs were analyzed through network meta-analysis and risk-of-bias assessment. We finally included 34 RCTs with a median (range/total) Physiotherapy Evidence Database score of 6.5 (4–8/10). DI plus resistance ET, resistance ET alone, and aerobic ET alone were ranked as the most effective treatments for increasing muscle mass (standard mean difference (SMD) = 1.40), muscle strength (SMD = 1.93), and walking speed (SMD = 0.46). Our findings suggest that DI+ET is beneficial overall for muscle mass in overweight or obese adults with lower-limb osteoarthritis, especially those who are undergoing weight management.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1992
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Exercise training
  • Muscle mass
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Physical function
  • Sarcopenia
  • Overweight/complications
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Sarcopenia/complications
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Muscle Strength/physiology
  • Organ Size
  • Exercise/physiology
  • Risk
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Osteoarthritis/complications
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Muscle, Skeletal/pathology
  • Regression Analysis
  • Walking/physiology
  • Publication Bias
  • Adult
  • Aged

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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