Relationship between belief about analgesics, analgesic adherence and pain experience in taiwanese cancer outpatients

Shu Yuan Liang, Kang Pan Chen, Shiow Luan Tsay, Shu Fang Wu, Yeu Hui Chuang, Tsae Jyy Wang, Heng Hsin Tung, Su Fen Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social and behavioral scientists have proposed that a person's belief system crucially influences his or her behaviour, and therefore may affect outcomes of pain management. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between analgesic beliefs, analgesic adherence and pain experience amongst Taiwanese cancer outpatients. The cross-sectional study included 92 oncology outpatients in two teaching hospitals in the Taipei area of Taiwan. The research instruments included the Pain Opioid Analgesic Beliefs Scale-Cancer (POABSCA), opioid adherence, and the Brief Pain Inventory-Chinese (BPI-Chinese). Beliefs about pain and opioids demonstrated a significant relationship with patients' opioid adherence (r = -0.30, p <0.01). The more negative beliefs regarding opioids and pain the patient had, the worse their adherence to around the clock (ATC) analgesic regimen. However, there was no significant correlation between opioid belief and pain experience. As well, there were no significant relationships between adherence to opioid regimen and any of the measures of pain experience. The study highlights the potential importance of a patient's pain and opioid beliefs in adherence to pain medication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)713-716
Number of pages4
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Analgesics
Opioid Analgesics
Outpatients
Pain
Neoplasms
Pain Management
Patient Compliance
Taiwan
Teaching Hospitals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Equipment and Supplies
Research

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Analgesics
  • Beliefs
  • Cancer pain.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Relationship between belief about analgesics, analgesic adherence and pain experience in taiwanese cancer outpatients. / Liang, Shu Yuan; Chen, Kang Pan; Tsay, Shiow Luan; Wu, Shu Fang; Chuang, Yeu Hui; Wang, Tsae Jyy; Tung, Heng Hsin; Cheng, Su Fen.

In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2013, p. 713-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liang, Shu Yuan ; Chen, Kang Pan ; Tsay, Shiow Luan ; Wu, Shu Fang ; Chuang, Yeu Hui ; Wang, Tsae Jyy ; Tung, Heng Hsin ; Cheng, Su Fen. / Relationship between belief about analgesics, analgesic adherence and pain experience in taiwanese cancer outpatients. In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 713-716.
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