Abstract

There were differences in risk factors between men and women and between two follow-up time lengths. Osteoporosis was significantly associated with recurrent falls for women but not for men. The relationship of osteoporosis with falls in the past year decreased during follow-up, while those of sedatives and hypnotics remained. Introduction: A prospective study to investigate relationships between osteoporosis and recurrent falls at two follow-up lengths of 6 and 12 months in older men and women. Methods: In total, 204 men and 447 women who visited an emergency department due to a fall were recruited. Results: For men, the risk of falling was not significantly associated with osteoporosis at 6 or 12 months. Men with a fall history were 127 and 100 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Men who did not use walking aids were 97 % more likely to have a fall at 12 months than those who did. Women with osteoporosis were 246 and 104 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women with a fall history were 129 and 66 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women taking sedatives and hypnotics were 75 and 102 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than their counterparts. Women with depression were 138 % more likely to have a fall at 6 months and those using walking aids were 59 % more likely to have a fall at 12 months, compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Osteoporosis is association with falls for older women but not for older men. Identifying risk factors for recurrent falls in older people may be affected by the follow-up length, as their associations are reduced over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-871
Number of pages9
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Osteoporosis
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Walking
Accidental Falls
History
Hospital Emergency Service
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Follow-up time
  • Older people
  • Osteoporosis
  • Recurrent falls
  • Taiwan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Relations of osteoporosis and follow-up duration to recurrent falls in older men and women. / Lin, M. R.; Hwang, H. F.; Lin, P. S.; Chen, C. Y.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 25, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 863-871.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "There were differences in risk factors between men and women and between two follow-up time lengths. Osteoporosis was significantly associated with recurrent falls for women but not for men. The relationship of osteoporosis with falls in the past year decreased during follow-up, while those of sedatives and hypnotics remained. Introduction: A prospective study to investigate relationships between osteoporosis and recurrent falls at two follow-up lengths of 6 and 12 months in older men and women. Methods: In total, 204 men and 447 women who visited an emergency department due to a fall were recruited. Results: For men, the risk of falling was not significantly associated with osteoporosis at 6 or 12 months. Men with a fall history were 127 and 100 {\%}, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Men who did not use walking aids were 97 {\%} more likely to have a fall at 12 months than those who did. Women with osteoporosis were 246 and 104 {\%}, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women with a fall history were 129 and 66 {\%}, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women taking sedatives and hypnotics were 75 and 102 {\%}, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than their counterparts. Women with depression were 138 {\%} more likely to have a fall at 6 months and those using walking aids were 59 {\%} more likely to have a fall at 12 months, compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Osteoporosis is association with falls for older women but not for older men. Identifying risk factors for recurrent falls in older people may be affected by the follow-up length, as their associations are reduced over time.",
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AU - Lin, P. S.

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N2 - There were differences in risk factors between men and women and between two follow-up time lengths. Osteoporosis was significantly associated with recurrent falls for women but not for men. The relationship of osteoporosis with falls in the past year decreased during follow-up, while those of sedatives and hypnotics remained. Introduction: A prospective study to investigate relationships between osteoporosis and recurrent falls at two follow-up lengths of 6 and 12 months in older men and women. Methods: In total, 204 men and 447 women who visited an emergency department due to a fall were recruited. Results: For men, the risk of falling was not significantly associated with osteoporosis at 6 or 12 months. Men with a fall history were 127 and 100 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Men who did not use walking aids were 97 % more likely to have a fall at 12 months than those who did. Women with osteoporosis were 246 and 104 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women with a fall history were 129 and 66 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women taking sedatives and hypnotics were 75 and 102 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than their counterparts. Women with depression were 138 % more likely to have a fall at 6 months and those using walking aids were 59 % more likely to have a fall at 12 months, compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Osteoporosis is association with falls for older women but not for older men. Identifying risk factors for recurrent falls in older people may be affected by the follow-up length, as their associations are reduced over time.

AB - There were differences in risk factors between men and women and between two follow-up time lengths. Osteoporosis was significantly associated with recurrent falls for women but not for men. The relationship of osteoporosis with falls in the past year decreased during follow-up, while those of sedatives and hypnotics remained. Introduction: A prospective study to investigate relationships between osteoporosis and recurrent falls at two follow-up lengths of 6 and 12 months in older men and women. Methods: In total, 204 men and 447 women who visited an emergency department due to a fall were recruited. Results: For men, the risk of falling was not significantly associated with osteoporosis at 6 or 12 months. Men with a fall history were 127 and 100 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Men who did not use walking aids were 97 % more likely to have a fall at 12 months than those who did. Women with osteoporosis were 246 and 104 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women with a fall history were 129 and 66 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than those without. Women taking sedatives and hypnotics were 75 and 102 %, respectively, more likely to have a fall at 6 and 12 months than their counterparts. Women with depression were 138 % more likely to have a fall at 6 months and those using walking aids were 59 % more likely to have a fall at 12 months, compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Osteoporosis is association with falls for older women but not for older men. Identifying risk factors for recurrent falls in older people may be affected by the follow-up length, as their associations are reduced over time.

KW - Follow-up time

KW - Older people

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