Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Presenting as a Positron Emission Tomography False-negative Scan

Chien Shih, Jenq Yuh Ko, Cheng Ping Wang, Lai Lei Ting, Jong Kai Hsiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) is valuable for detecting locoregional recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with a high sensitivity and fair specificity. A negative PET result is generally thought to confidently exclude the presence of a tumor. However, a false-negative PET scan is more dangerous than false-positive results because an undiscovered recurrent tumor may eventually lead to the patient's death without proper treatment. In this report, we describe a false-negative PET scan in a NPC patient with a recurrent tumor in the left cavernous sinus, presenting as a new onset of left 6th cranial nerve palsy 1 year after irradiation. The first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET scan failed to disclose any abnormalities. The second MRI performed 3 months after the first scans demonstrated a new abnormal lesion in the left cavernous sinus, which had resolved in the following MRI after re-irradiation. Therefore, clinical observation with suggestive symptoms is still important, even with negative imaging results. Close follow-up with a series of imaging studies must be performed when indicated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-330
Number of pages4
JournalTzu Chi Medical Journal
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Positron-Emission Tomography
Cavernous Sinus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Abducens Nerve Diseases
Cranial Nerve Diseases
Neoplasms
Observation
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Recurrence
Sensitivity and Specificity
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cavernous sinus
  • Diplopia
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
  • Positron emission tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Presenting as a Positron Emission Tomography False-negative Scan. / Shih, Chien; Ko, Jenq Yuh; Wang, Cheng Ping; Ting, Lai Lei; Hsiao, Jong Kai.

In: Tzu Chi Medical Journal, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.12.2009, p. 327-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shih, Chien ; Ko, Jenq Yuh ; Wang, Cheng Ping ; Ting, Lai Lei ; Hsiao, Jong Kai. / Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Presenting as a Positron Emission Tomography False-negative Scan. In: Tzu Chi Medical Journal. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 327-330.
@article{24306cab298b48208f1e747acdb9d06d,
title = "Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Presenting as a Positron Emission Tomography False-negative Scan",
abstract = "Positron emission tomography (PET) is valuable for detecting locoregional recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with a high sensitivity and fair specificity. A negative PET result is generally thought to confidently exclude the presence of a tumor. However, a false-negative PET scan is more dangerous than false-positive results because an undiscovered recurrent tumor may eventually lead to the patient's death without proper treatment. In this report, we describe a false-negative PET scan in a NPC patient with a recurrent tumor in the left cavernous sinus, presenting as a new onset of left 6th cranial nerve palsy 1 year after irradiation. The first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET scan failed to disclose any abnormalities. The second MRI performed 3 months after the first scans demonstrated a new abnormal lesion in the left cavernous sinus, which had resolved in the following MRI after re-irradiation. Therefore, clinical observation with suggestive symptoms is still important, even with negative imaging results. Close follow-up with a series of imaging studies must be performed when indicated.",
keywords = "Cavernous sinus, Diplopia, Magnetic resonance imaging, Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Positron emission tomography, Cavernous sinus, Diplopia, Magnetic resonance imaging, Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Positron emission tomography",
author = "Chien Shih and Ko, {Jenq Yuh} and Wang, {Cheng Ping} and Ting, {Lai Lei} and Hsiao, {Jong Kai}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1016-3190(09)60064-1",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "327--330",
journal = "Tzu Chi Medical Journal",
issn = "1016-3190",
publisher = "財團法人中華民國佛教慈濟慈善事業基金會",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Presenting as a Positron Emission Tomography False-negative Scan

AU - Shih, Chien

AU - Ko, Jenq Yuh

AU - Wang, Cheng Ping

AU - Ting, Lai Lei

AU - Hsiao, Jong Kai

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Positron emission tomography (PET) is valuable for detecting locoregional recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with a high sensitivity and fair specificity. A negative PET result is generally thought to confidently exclude the presence of a tumor. However, a false-negative PET scan is more dangerous than false-positive results because an undiscovered recurrent tumor may eventually lead to the patient's death without proper treatment. In this report, we describe a false-negative PET scan in a NPC patient with a recurrent tumor in the left cavernous sinus, presenting as a new onset of left 6th cranial nerve palsy 1 year after irradiation. The first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET scan failed to disclose any abnormalities. The second MRI performed 3 months after the first scans demonstrated a new abnormal lesion in the left cavernous sinus, which had resolved in the following MRI after re-irradiation. Therefore, clinical observation with suggestive symptoms is still important, even with negative imaging results. Close follow-up with a series of imaging studies must be performed when indicated.

AB - Positron emission tomography (PET) is valuable for detecting locoregional recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with a high sensitivity and fair specificity. A negative PET result is generally thought to confidently exclude the presence of a tumor. However, a false-negative PET scan is more dangerous than false-positive results because an undiscovered recurrent tumor may eventually lead to the patient's death without proper treatment. In this report, we describe a false-negative PET scan in a NPC patient with a recurrent tumor in the left cavernous sinus, presenting as a new onset of left 6th cranial nerve palsy 1 year after irradiation. The first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET scan failed to disclose any abnormalities. The second MRI performed 3 months after the first scans demonstrated a new abnormal lesion in the left cavernous sinus, which had resolved in the following MRI after re-irradiation. Therefore, clinical observation with suggestive symptoms is still important, even with negative imaging results. Close follow-up with a series of imaging studies must be performed when indicated.

KW - Cavernous sinus

KW - Diplopia

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

KW - Positron emission tomography

KW - Cavernous sinus

KW - Diplopia

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

KW - Positron emission tomography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=72649086618&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=72649086618&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1016-3190(09)60064-1

DO - 10.1016/S1016-3190(09)60064-1

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:72649086618

VL - 21

SP - 327

EP - 330

JO - Tzu Chi Medical Journal

JF - Tzu Chi Medical Journal

SN - 1016-3190

IS - 4

ER -