Recovery of vasomotor response in human spinal cord transection

S. H. Tsai, C. J. Shih, T. T. Shyy, J. C. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vasomotor responses of the skin of the thumb and the big toe was measured in normal subjects and patients with spinal transection at a neutral ambient temperature of 22.0±0.5°C, and in a cool (12.0±0.5°C) and warm (32.0±0.5°C) environment. The vasomotor response of the hand and foot to the cooling and warming of part of the opposite upper or lower extremity was also recorded. Spinal transection at T5-11 abolishes acutely all vasomotor responses in the paraplegic lower extremities, but does not alter the responses in the upper extremities. By 4 months, the vasomotor tone in the lower extremities at a neutral ambient temperature returned to normal values as did the response to a cool and warm environment. The crossed vasomotor reflex to cooling and warming one lower extremity recovers more slowly, requiring a period of 18 months for complete recovery. The slower recovery of the vasomotor reflex in spinally transected man than in similarly treated dogs is thought to be due to the greater spinal shock in the former. The recovery of vasomotor responses in the paraplegic limbs to cooling and warming after thoracic transections suggests that these responses are primitive and powerful thermoregulatory mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)808-811
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume52
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Injuries
Lower Extremity
Reflex
Hallux
Temperature
Thumb
Upper Extremity
Foot
Shock
Reference Values
Thorax
Extremities
Hand
Dogs
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Tsai, S. H., Shih, C. J., Shyy, T. T., & Liu, J. C. (1980). Recovery of vasomotor response in human spinal cord transection. Journal of Neurosurgery, 52(6), 808-811.

Recovery of vasomotor response in human spinal cord transection. / Tsai, S. H.; Shih, C. J.; Shyy, T. T.; Liu, J. C.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 52, No. 6, 1980, p. 808-811.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsai, SH, Shih, CJ, Shyy, TT & Liu, JC 1980, 'Recovery of vasomotor response in human spinal cord transection', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 808-811.
Tsai, S. H. ; Shih, C. J. ; Shyy, T. T. ; Liu, J. C. / Recovery of vasomotor response in human spinal cord transection. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1980 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 808-811.
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