Recommendations for rotavirus vaccine

Ping Ing Lee, Po Yen Chen, Yhu Chering Huang, Chin Yun Lee, Chun Yi Lu, Mei Hwei Chang, Yung Zen Lin, Nan Chang Chiu, Yen Hsuan Ni, Chung Ming Chen, Luan Yin Chang, Ren Bin Tang, Li Min Huang, Yung Feng Huang, Kao Pin Hwang, Betau Hwang, Tzou Yien Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rotavirus infection has been the leading cause of gastroenteritis among children in Taiwan. Studies have shown that 40% of hospitalization for acute gastroenteritis can be prevented through the use of vaccines, including a live, attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine and a pentavalent, human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine. In 2009, the World Health Organization suggested that rotavirus vaccine should be included in all national immunization programs. This review summarizes issues and recommendations discussed during an expert meeting in Taiwan. The recommendations included: (1) rotavirus vaccine should be offered to all healthy infants (including those without contraindications, such as immunodeficiency) at an appropriate age; (2) either monovalent or pentavalent vaccine can be administered concurrently with routine injected vaccines; (3) the administration of rotavirus vaccine must be administered at least 2 weeks prior to oral polio vaccination; (4) the first vaccine dose for infants should be administered between age 6 weeks and age 14 weeks 6 days and the course should be completed by age 8 months 0 day; (5) pentavalent vaccines can be administered at 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months while monovalent vaccines can be taken at 2 months and 4 months; (6) a combined use of monovalent and pentavalent vaccine is justified only when the previous dose is unavailable or unknown; and (7) rotavirus vaccines may be given to premature infants, human immunodeficiency virus infected infants and infants who have received or are going to receive blood products.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-359
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics and Neonatology
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Rotavirus Vaccines
Vaccines
Gastroenteritis
Taiwan
Rotavirus Infections
Immunization Programs
Poliomyelitis
Premature Infants
Vaccination
Hospitalization
HIV

Keywords

  • diarrhea
  • recommendation
  • rotavirus infection
  • Taiwan
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Lee, P. I., Chen, P. Y., Huang, Y. C., Lee, C. Y., Lu, C. Y., Chang, M. H., ... Lin, T. Y. (2013). Recommendations for rotavirus vaccine. Pediatrics and Neonatology, 54(6), 355-359. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedneo.2013.03.019

Recommendations for rotavirus vaccine. / Lee, Ping Ing; Chen, Po Yen; Huang, Yhu Chering; Lee, Chin Yun; Lu, Chun Yi; Chang, Mei Hwei; Lin, Yung Zen; Chiu, Nan Chang; Ni, Yen Hsuan; Chen, Chung Ming; Chang, Luan Yin; Tang, Ren Bin; Huang, Li Min; Huang, Yung Feng; Hwang, Kao Pin; Hwang, Betau; Lin, Tzou Yien.

In: Pediatrics and Neonatology, Vol. 54, No. 6, 12.2013, p. 355-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, PI, Chen, PY, Huang, YC, Lee, CY, Lu, CY, Chang, MH, Lin, YZ, Chiu, NC, Ni, YH, Chen, CM, Chang, LY, Tang, RB, Huang, LM, Huang, YF, Hwang, KP, Hwang, B & Lin, TY 2013, 'Recommendations for rotavirus vaccine', Pediatrics and Neonatology, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 355-359. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedneo.2013.03.019
Lee PI, Chen PY, Huang YC, Lee CY, Lu CY, Chang MH et al. Recommendations for rotavirus vaccine. Pediatrics and Neonatology. 2013 Dec;54(6):355-359. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedneo.2013.03.019
Lee, Ping Ing ; Chen, Po Yen ; Huang, Yhu Chering ; Lee, Chin Yun ; Lu, Chun Yi ; Chang, Mei Hwei ; Lin, Yung Zen ; Chiu, Nan Chang ; Ni, Yen Hsuan ; Chen, Chung Ming ; Chang, Luan Yin ; Tang, Ren Bin ; Huang, Li Min ; Huang, Yung Feng ; Hwang, Kao Pin ; Hwang, Betau ; Lin, Tzou Yien. / Recommendations for rotavirus vaccine. In: Pediatrics and Neonatology. 2013 ; Vol. 54, No. 6. pp. 355-359.
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