Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection

Y. C. Luan, M. C. Shieh, S. T. Chen, H. T. Kung, K. L. Soong, Y. C. Yeh, T. S. Chou, W. C. Fang, S. L. Yao, C. J. Pong, S. H. Mong, J. T. Wu, J. M. Wu, H. J. Jen, W. L. Chen, W. P. Deng, M. F. Wu, M. L. Shen, C. P. Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The health effects of radiation from atomic explosions in Japan were completely different from those due to radiation from the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan. The sudden exposure to acute radiation in extremely high doses killed Japanese people, and harmed the survivors in lower doses as shown by increased cancer mortality, especially the leukemia based on the LNT model. The chronic radiation received by the residents unknowingly in the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan, even in higher doses, caused no excess cancer deaths; on the contrary their spontaneous cancer deaths were sharply reduced to only about 2.5% of that of the general population, and hereditary defects in their offspring were only 5%-7% of those of the normal population. Therefore, the residents in the Co-60 contamination apartments had coincidently accomplished a human experiment of the health effects to human beings. The chronic radiation received from the Co-60 contaminated houses is quite similar to the radiation exposure to the workers and public in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and medical radiation. Acute radiation from a nuclear accident could harm a limited number of people, but the chronic radiation might benefit people, such as in the case of the Chernobyl accident. People should not be fearful of chronic exposure to low radiation and the traditional radiation protection policy and practices used in past 60 years should be revised based on the health effects observed in Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-44
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Low Radiation
Volume3
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Radiation Protection
Radiation
Health
Taiwan
Radioactive Hazard Release
Nuclear Energy
Neoplasms
Explosions
Radiation Effects
Population
Accidents
Survivors
Japan
Leukemia
Mortality

Keywords

  • Beneficial health effects
  • Chronic radiation
  • Co-60 contaminated apartments
  • Low dose rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Luan, Y. C., Shieh, M. C., Chen, S. T., Kung, H. T., Soong, K. L., Yeh, Y. C., ... Sun, C. P. (2006). Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection. International Journal of Low Radiation, 3(1), 27-44.

Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection. / Luan, Y. C.; Shieh, M. C.; Chen, S. T.; Kung, H. T.; Soong, K. L.; Yeh, Y. C.; Chou, T. S.; Fang, W. C.; Yao, S. L.; Pong, C. J.; Mong, S. H.; Wu, J. T.; Wu, J. M.; Jen, H. J.; Chen, W. L.; Deng, W. P.; Wu, M. F.; Shen, M. L.; Sun, C. P.

In: International Journal of Low Radiation, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2006, p. 27-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luan, YC, Shieh, MC, Chen, ST, Kung, HT, Soong, KL, Yeh, YC, Chou, TS, Fang, WC, Yao, SL, Pong, CJ, Mong, SH, Wu, JT, Wu, JM, Jen, HJ, Chen, WL, Deng, WP, Wu, MF, Shen, ML & Sun, CP 2006, 'Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection', International Journal of Low Radiation, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 27-44.
Luan YC, Shieh MC, Chen ST, Kung HT, Soong KL, Yeh YC et al. Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection. International Journal of Low Radiation. 2006;3(1):27-44.
Luan, Y. C. ; Shieh, M. C. ; Chen, S. T. ; Kung, H. T. ; Soong, K. L. ; Yeh, Y. C. ; Chou, T. S. ; Fang, W. C. ; Yao, S. L. ; Pong, C. J. ; Mong, S. H. ; Wu, J. T. ; Wu, J. M. ; Jen, H. J. ; Chen, W. L. ; Deng, W. P. ; Wu, M. F. ; Shen, M. L. ; Sun, C. P. / Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection. In: International Journal of Low Radiation. 2006 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 27-44.
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