Abstract

Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in cognitive function and muscle atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This quantitative study used surface electromyography (sEMG) to investigate changes in muscular activity, which may indicate a deficiency of ACh among patients with cognitive impairment. We recruited 9 controls without dementia, 6 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 6 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). None of the participants had sleep complaints, and all AD patients were receiving cholinesterase inhibitors. Subjects underwent polysomnography (PSG), including sEMG of the leg muscles, which was analyzed using root mean square (rms), mean frequency, and peak frequency. The average rms values during REM sleep among the control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.553 ± 0.177, 2.886 ± 2.865, and 0.909 ± 0.822, respectively. The average peak frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.402 ± 0.758, 30.524 ± 32.237, and 0.566 ± 1.153, respectively. The average mean frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 8.849 ± 6.071, 34.530 ± 25.564, and 9.553 ± 6.308, respectively. All rms, mean frequencies, and peak frequencies increased significantly (p <0.05) in MCI patients. A deficiency of ACh may result in an increase of sEMG activity in MCI patients. Because cholinesterase inhibitors are capable of suppressing sEMG activity in AD patients, we speculate that an increase in sEMG activity is associated with a deficiency of Ach, which could be an early indicator of dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-37
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume305
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 2011

Fingerprint

REM Sleep
Sleep
Electromyography
Alzheimer Disease
Acetylcholine
Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction
Muscles
Polysomnography
Cognition
Leg

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • REM sleep atonia
  • Root mean square
  • Surface electromyography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Rapid eye movement sleep atonia in patients with cognitive impairment",
abstract = "Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in cognitive function and muscle atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This quantitative study used surface electromyography (sEMG) to investigate changes in muscular activity, which may indicate a deficiency of ACh among patients with cognitive impairment. We recruited 9 controls without dementia, 6 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 6 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). None of the participants had sleep complaints, and all AD patients were receiving cholinesterase inhibitors. Subjects underwent polysomnography (PSG), including sEMG of the leg muscles, which was analyzed using root mean square (rms), mean frequency, and peak frequency. The average rms values during REM sleep among the control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.553 ± 0.177, 2.886 ± 2.865, and 0.909 ± 0.822, respectively. The average peak frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.402 ± 0.758, 30.524 ± 32.237, and 0.566 ± 1.153, respectively. The average mean frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 8.849 ± 6.071, 34.530 ± 25.564, and 9.553 ± 6.308, respectively. All rms, mean frequencies, and peak frequencies increased significantly (p <0.05) in MCI patients. A deficiency of ACh may result in an increase of sEMG activity in MCI patients. Because cholinesterase inhibitors are capable of suppressing sEMG activity in AD patients, we speculate that an increase in sEMG activity is associated with a deficiency of Ach, which could be an early indicator of dementia.",
keywords = "Alzheimer disease, Mild cognitive impairment, REM sleep atonia, Root mean square, Surface electromyography",
author = "Chen, {Po Chih} and Dean Wu and Chen, {Chih Chung} and Chi, {Nai Fang} and Kang, {Jiunn Horng} and Hu, {Chaur Jong}",
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T1 - Rapid eye movement sleep atonia in patients with cognitive impairment

AU - Chen, Po Chih

AU - Wu, Dean

AU - Chen, Chih Chung

AU - Chi, Nai Fang

AU - Kang, Jiunn Horng

AU - Hu, Chaur Jong

PY - 2011/6/15

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N2 - Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in cognitive function and muscle atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This quantitative study used surface electromyography (sEMG) to investigate changes in muscular activity, which may indicate a deficiency of ACh among patients with cognitive impairment. We recruited 9 controls without dementia, 6 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 6 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). None of the participants had sleep complaints, and all AD patients were receiving cholinesterase inhibitors. Subjects underwent polysomnography (PSG), including sEMG of the leg muscles, which was analyzed using root mean square (rms), mean frequency, and peak frequency. The average rms values during REM sleep among the control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.553 ± 0.177, 2.886 ± 2.865, and 0.909 ± 0.822, respectively. The average peak frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.402 ± 0.758, 30.524 ± 32.237, and 0.566 ± 1.153, respectively. The average mean frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 8.849 ± 6.071, 34.530 ± 25.564, and 9.553 ± 6.308, respectively. All rms, mean frequencies, and peak frequencies increased significantly (p <0.05) in MCI patients. A deficiency of ACh may result in an increase of sEMG activity in MCI patients. Because cholinesterase inhibitors are capable of suppressing sEMG activity in AD patients, we speculate that an increase in sEMG activity is associated with a deficiency of Ach, which could be an early indicator of dementia.

AB - Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in cognitive function and muscle atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This quantitative study used surface electromyography (sEMG) to investigate changes in muscular activity, which may indicate a deficiency of ACh among patients with cognitive impairment. We recruited 9 controls without dementia, 6 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 6 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). None of the participants had sleep complaints, and all AD patients were receiving cholinesterase inhibitors. Subjects underwent polysomnography (PSG), including sEMG of the leg muscles, which was analyzed using root mean square (rms), mean frequency, and peak frequency. The average rms values during REM sleep among the control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.553 ± 0.177, 2.886 ± 2.865, and 0.909 ± 0.822, respectively. The average peak frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 0.402 ± 0.758, 30.524 ± 32.237, and 0.566 ± 1.153, respectively. The average mean frequencies during REM sleep in control, MCI, and AD patients were 8.849 ± 6.071, 34.530 ± 25.564, and 9.553 ± 6.308, respectively. All rms, mean frequencies, and peak frequencies increased significantly (p <0.05) in MCI patients. A deficiency of ACh may result in an increase of sEMG activity in MCI patients. Because cholinesterase inhibitors are capable of suppressing sEMG activity in AD patients, we speculate that an increase in sEMG activity is associated with a deficiency of Ach, which could be an early indicator of dementia.

KW - Alzheimer disease

KW - Mild cognitive impairment

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KW - Root mean square

KW - Surface electromyography

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