Psychosocial Adjustment Changes and Related Factors in Postoperative Oral Cancer Patients: A Longitudinal Study

Yi-Wei Chen, Ting-Ru Lin, Pei-Ling Kuo, Shu-Chiung Lee, Kuo-Feng Wu, Tuyen V. Duong, Tsae-Jyy Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Disease and treatment-related symptoms and dysfunctions can interfere with the psychosocial adjustment of patients with oral cancer. Identifying factors influencing psychosocial maladjustment is important because at-risk individuals can be targeted for early intervention. This prospective longitudinal study investigated psychosocial adjustment changes and associated factors in postoperative oral cancer patients. Data on psychosocial adjustment, facial disfigurement, symptoms, and social support were collected before surgery (T1) at one month (T2), three months (T3), and five months after discharge (T4). Fifty subjects completed the study, and their data were included in the analysis. Psychosocial maladjustment was reported in 50%, 59.2%, 66%, and 62% of subjects at T1, T2, T3, and T4, respectively. The subjects’ psychosocial adjustment deteriorated after surgery. Results from generalized estimating equations indicated that financial status, cancer stage, pain, speech problems, social eating problems, and less sexuality were significant predictors of changes in psychosocial adjustment. Patients with insufficient income, stage III/IV cancer, severe pain, speech problems, social eating problems, and less sexuality were at higher risk for postoperative psychosocial maladjustment. Continued psychosocial assessment and appropriate supportive measures are needed to strengthen the psychosocial adjustment of these high-risk groups.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBiomedicines
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

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