Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Background: Light motorcycles (LMCs, with cylinder capacities between 50 to 250cc) are popular for commuting in developing countries. Objectives: With increasing LMC casualties in Taiwan, we conducted a multicenter study to analyze the effects of riders’ psycho-cognitive factors on injury severity. Methods: Riders who were hospitalized upon LMC crashes were contacted. Information of riders’ demographics and psycho-cognitive factors were collected via questionnaire and linked to hospital data. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Length of Hospitalization (LOH) were applied as injury severity indicators. Results: Totally 725 patients completed their questionnaires. The mean age was 37.7 years and 64% of the patients were male. The multivariate analyses showed age≧65 (Odds ratio: 3.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.99–7.09, P valve: <0.0001), alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (2.34, 1.09-5.03, 0.029) and fatigue riding (1.86, 1.00-3.43, 0.049) were significant risk factors for ISS ≥ 9. For increased LOH, age between 18-24 and ≥ 65 year-old (Standardized β coefficient: 0.09, P valve: 0.036 and 0.13, 0.002 respectively), psychiatric disease (0.08, 0.038) and alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (0.11, 0.005) were significant risk factors. However, motorcycle crashes due to distraction by roadside scenery or activity resulted in a shorter LOH (-0.08, 0.049). Discussion, Conclusions and Implications: Certain riders’ psych-cognitive factors were significantly associated with injury severity after LMC crashes and related medical resources consumption in Taiwan. Namely LMC crashes have risk factors of injury severity not similar to those of heavy motorcycles in developed countries and deserve more attention for injury prevention. A further in-depth evaluation of such significant risk factors should yield valuable information to reduce severe injuries after LMC crashes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019
Event22nd International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety Conference -
Duration: Aug 18 2019Aug 21 2019

Conference

Conference22nd International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety Conference
Period8/18/198/21/19

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Motorcycles
Taiwan
Light
Wounds and Injuries
Injury Severity Score
Hospitalization
Alcohols
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Multicenter Studies
Fatigue
Psychiatry
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Demography
Confidence Intervals

Cite this

Shu Kei Lam, C., Pai, C-W., & Chiu, W-T. (2019). Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan. Abstract from 22nd International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety Conference, .

Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan. / Shu Kei Lam, Carlos; Pai, Chih-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Ta.

2019. Abstract from 22nd International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety Conference, .

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Shu Kei Lam C, Pai C-W, Chiu W-T. Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan. 2019. Abstract from 22nd International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety Conference, .
Shu Kei Lam, Carlos ; Pai, Chih-Wei ; Chiu, Wen-Ta. / Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan. Abstract from 22nd International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety Conference, .
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title = "Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan",
abstract = "Background: Light motorcycles (LMCs, with cylinder capacities between 50 to 250cc) are popular for commuting in developing countries. Objectives: With increasing LMC casualties in Taiwan, we conducted a multicenter study to analyze the effects of riders’ psycho-cognitive factors on injury severity. Methods: Riders who were hospitalized upon LMC crashes were contacted. Information of riders’ demographics and psycho-cognitive factors were collected via questionnaire and linked to hospital data. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Length of Hospitalization (LOH) were applied as injury severity indicators. Results: Totally 725 patients completed their questionnaires. The mean age was 37.7 years and 64{\%} of the patients were male. The multivariate analyses showed age≧65 (Odds ratio: 3.75, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.99–7.09, P valve: <0.0001), alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (2.34, 1.09-5.03, 0.029) and fatigue riding (1.86, 1.00-3.43, 0.049) were significant risk factors for ISS ≥ 9. For increased LOH, age between 18-24 and ≥ 65 year-old (Standardized β coefficient: 0.09, P valve: 0.036 and 0.13, 0.002 respectively), psychiatric disease (0.08, 0.038) and alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (0.11, 0.005) were significant risk factors. However, motorcycle crashes due to distraction by roadside scenery or activity resulted in a shorter LOH (-0.08, 0.049). Discussion, Conclusions and Implications: Certain riders’ psych-cognitive factors were significantly associated with injury severity after LMC crashes and related medical resources consumption in Taiwan. Namely LMC crashes have risk factors of injury severity not similar to those of heavy motorcycles in developed countries and deserve more attention for injury prevention. A further in-depth evaluation of such significant risk factors should yield valuable information to reduce severe injuries after LMC crashes.",
author = "{Shu Kei Lam}, Carlos and Chih-Wei Pai and Wen-Ta Chiu",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 18-08-2019 Through 21-08-2019",

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T1 - Psycho-cognitive factors associated with severe injury after crashes of light motorcycles: A multi-center study in Taiwan

AU - Shu Kei Lam, Carlos

AU - Pai, Chih-Wei

AU - Chiu, Wen-Ta

PY - 2019/8

Y1 - 2019/8

N2 - Background: Light motorcycles (LMCs, with cylinder capacities between 50 to 250cc) are popular for commuting in developing countries. Objectives: With increasing LMC casualties in Taiwan, we conducted a multicenter study to analyze the effects of riders’ psycho-cognitive factors on injury severity. Methods: Riders who were hospitalized upon LMC crashes were contacted. Information of riders’ demographics and psycho-cognitive factors were collected via questionnaire and linked to hospital data. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Length of Hospitalization (LOH) were applied as injury severity indicators. Results: Totally 725 patients completed their questionnaires. The mean age was 37.7 years and 64% of the patients were male. The multivariate analyses showed age≧65 (Odds ratio: 3.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.99–7.09, P valve: <0.0001), alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (2.34, 1.09-5.03, 0.029) and fatigue riding (1.86, 1.00-3.43, 0.049) were significant risk factors for ISS ≥ 9. For increased LOH, age between 18-24 and ≥ 65 year-old (Standardized β coefficient: 0.09, P valve: 0.036 and 0.13, 0.002 respectively), psychiatric disease (0.08, 0.038) and alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (0.11, 0.005) were significant risk factors. However, motorcycle crashes due to distraction by roadside scenery or activity resulted in a shorter LOH (-0.08, 0.049). Discussion, Conclusions and Implications: Certain riders’ psych-cognitive factors were significantly associated with injury severity after LMC crashes and related medical resources consumption in Taiwan. Namely LMC crashes have risk factors of injury severity not similar to those of heavy motorcycles in developed countries and deserve more attention for injury prevention. A further in-depth evaluation of such significant risk factors should yield valuable information to reduce severe injuries after LMC crashes.

AB - Background: Light motorcycles (LMCs, with cylinder capacities between 50 to 250cc) are popular for commuting in developing countries. Objectives: With increasing LMC casualties in Taiwan, we conducted a multicenter study to analyze the effects of riders’ psycho-cognitive factors on injury severity. Methods: Riders who were hospitalized upon LMC crashes were contacted. Information of riders’ demographics and psycho-cognitive factors were collected via questionnaire and linked to hospital data. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Length of Hospitalization (LOH) were applied as injury severity indicators. Results: Totally 725 patients completed their questionnaires. The mean age was 37.7 years and 64% of the patients were male. The multivariate analyses showed age≧65 (Odds ratio: 3.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.99–7.09, P valve: <0.0001), alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (2.34, 1.09-5.03, 0.029) and fatigue riding (1.86, 1.00-3.43, 0.049) were significant risk factors for ISS ≥ 9. For increased LOH, age between 18-24 and ≥ 65 year-old (Standardized β coefficient: 0.09, P valve: 0.036 and 0.13, 0.002 respectively), psychiatric disease (0.08, 0.038) and alcohol/ stimulating refreshments consumption (0.11, 0.005) were significant risk factors. However, motorcycle crashes due to distraction by roadside scenery or activity resulted in a shorter LOH (-0.08, 0.049). Discussion, Conclusions and Implications: Certain riders’ psych-cognitive factors were significantly associated with injury severity after LMC crashes and related medical resources consumption in Taiwan. Namely LMC crashes have risk factors of injury severity not similar to those of heavy motorcycles in developed countries and deserve more attention for injury prevention. A further in-depth evaluation of such significant risk factors should yield valuable information to reduce severe injuries after LMC crashes.

M3 - Abstract

ER -