Protective effects of camellia oil (Camellia brevistyla) against indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage in vitro and in vivo

Ruei Yu Wang, Yu Tang Tung, Sheng Yi Chen, Ya Lin Lee, Gow Chin Yen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Accumulating evidence reveals that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as indomethacin, cause oxidative stress and inflammation, which consequently cause gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage. Camellia oil, a common edible oil used in Asia, has excellent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory characteristics. Herein, we examined the benefits and protective effects of camellia oil in indomethacin-induced human intestinal Int-407 cells and a mouse model of indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage. Camellia oil pretreatment significantly increased cell viability and wound healing and reduced reactive oxygen species production in indomethacin-induced Int-407 cells. In vivo experiments revealed that camellia oil preadministration prevented gastric wound generation by decreasing inflammatory mediators interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 levels; increasing heme oxygenase-1 antioxidant protein level; and elevating transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in indomethacin-induced BALB/c mice. Thus, camellia oil is a functional dietary oil that prevents oxidative damage and inflammation in NSAID-induced GI mucosal damage.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103539
JournalJournal of Functional Foods
Volume62
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Camellia
indomethacin
Indomethacin
protective effect
Oils
oils
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents
Stomach
heme oxygenase (biliverdin-producing)
stomach
Unsaturated Dietary Fats
Inflammation
Gastrointestinal Agents
inflammation
Heme Oxygenase-1
Transforming Growth Factors
transforming growth factors
Cyclooxygenase 2
vascular endothelial growth factors

Keywords

  • Antioxidant enzyme
  • Camellia oil
  • Gastrointestinal mucosal damage
  • Indomethacin
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Protective effects of camellia oil (Camellia brevistyla) against indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage in vitro and in vivo. / Wang, Ruei Yu; Tung, Yu Tang; Chen, Sheng Yi; Lee, Ya Lin; Yen, Gow Chin.

In: Journal of Functional Foods, Vol. 62, 103539, 01.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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